• News_Image_103
    AM is highlighting the top 10 stories of 2009. At number 3 is the launch of Kepler, a new NASA telescope that will aid in finding extrasolar planets. Scientists are already looking beyond Kepler for the next generation of telescopes that could show alien worlds
    read more
  • News_Image_47
    AM is highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of 2009. At number 4 is evidence of liquid water droplets forming on the leg of the Phoenix lander. Scientist had assumed ice turned directly into water vapor on Mars' surface, but the water droplets on Phoenix
    read more
  • Astrobiology Top 10: Reanimating Extinct Genes
    AM is looking back over 2009, highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of the year. Our story number 5 is about research to insert ancient genes into modern bacteria. Will the bacteria evolve the same way it did in the past, or will it
    read more
  • Astrobiology Top 10: Double Discovery: Super-Earth and Ocean World
    Astrobiology Magazine is looking back over 2009, highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of the year. At number 6 is a double discovery of potentially habitable extrasolar planets orbiting the star Gliese 581. (This story originally was published on April 23, 2009).
    read more
  • News_Image_123
    AM is looking back over the top 10 astrobiology stories of 2009. At number 7 is a story about research conducted at Mono Lake, near Yosemite National Park. With one of the highest natural concentrations of arsenic on Earth, this spot is a good
    read more
  • News_Image_41
    AM is highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of 2009. At number 8 is a report that the amino acid glycine was found in samples from a comet. This supports the theory that some of the ingredients for life were delivered to the Earth by
    read more
  • News_Image_53
    Astrobiology Magazine is highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of the year. At number 9 is a story about astrometry, a technique to find extrasolar planets. After 50 years, astrometry spots its first planet - a milestone that could have implications for the proposed
    read more
  • News_Image_128
    Astrobiology Magazine is looking back over 2009, highlighting the top 10 astrobiology stories of the year. At number 10 is a debate about icy plumes emanating from Saturn´s tiny moon, Enceladus. Are the plumes evidence that the moon could have a liquid water ocean
    read more
  • News_Image_173
    New research indicates that life-bearing moons, such as those featured in Hollywood blockbusters, might be possible. If astronomers discover such a moon nearby, the James Webb Telescope may be able to study its atmospheres and detect key gases like carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor.
    read more
  • News_Image_170
    By recreating the conditions present on the early Earth, researchers have shown that substances considered essential in forming basic biological molecules can be obtained from a salt called Prussian blue. These substances include hydrogen cyanide, urea, lactic acid and other important precursors for the origin
    read more
  • News_Image_172
    New research, focusing on shallow hydrothermal vents, is shedding light on a possible location for where life on Earth began.
    read more
  • News_Image_411
    A new method of detecting past comet strikes on Earth could help scientists understand how frequent large impacts were in the past. The frequency of impacts could be used to determine the likelihood of future, catastrophic impacts.
    read more
  • The Zombie Argument
    With climate talks in Copenhagen underway, Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, discusses news coming out of the UN climate conference. The agreements (and disagreements) arising from Copenhagen could have profound effects on the future of life on Earth.
    read more
  • News_Image_171
    Astronomers have discovered a 'super-Earth' orbiting a distant star using off-the-Shelf, amateur technology. The finding shows how low-cost technologies can aid in the search for habitable worlds. The planet, GJ1214b, has a radius only 2.7 times that of Earth and may contain water and a
    read more
  • News_Image_169
    By studying the signatures of fossil life on Earth, geobiologists can get a clue of what to look for when hunting for extraterrestrial life on Mars.
    read more
1 of 31...Last »