• Headshake to SETI Headfake
    Did the famous screensaver, SETI@home, uncover the first strong evidence for an extraterrestrial signal? The SETI Institute's Seth Shostak discusses how hyperbole can misrepresent the last addition to a list of stellar candidates.
    more...
  • Arecibo Chronicle
    Getting the big picture in the search for life elsewhere is a challenging balance between technology and philosophy. The SETI Institute's Seth Shostak reports from the world's largest radio telescope, Arecibo, about new signal processing methods.
    more...
  • Calibrating the Moon
    If amateur astronomers can just drag their telescopes to a dark, clear spot and set-up a night's observation, the calibration of the world's largest radio telescope is not quite so straightforward.
    more...
  • Location, Location, Puerto Rico is Listening
    Twice a year, every spring and autumn, a SETI team travels to the coast of Puerto Rico. Their journey is one hundred times faster than the one that Columbus first set out on--500 years ago.
    more...
  • Mysteries of Wow
    In August 1977, a sky survey conducted with Ohio State University's "Big Ear" radio telescope found what has become known as the 'Wow' signal. Registering an enormous signal strength, the shape of the signal had the characteristic rise and fall expected for its short
    more...
  • Dyson’s Long Shot
    Renowned physicist Freeman Dyson, famous for his designs of grand energy collectors called Dyson's Sphere, has put down a public bet: life will first be discovered elsewhere not on a planet or moon, but someplace other than what we could recognize as terrestrial turf.
    more...
  • Galileo’s Spyglass
    Seth Shostak of the SETI Institute examines the revolution that the astronomer Galileo brought to the world by discovering moons around another planet. This changed what otherwise had persisted as a worldview since Aristotle placed Earth in the center of it the universe.
    more...
  • Life from the Heavens?
    The scientific community has been impressed with the robustness of environments that can support life, ranging from Antarctic lakes to salt mines to nuclear reactors. But conventional wisdom has presumed that life traveling to Earth on a fiery meteor--if possible--would meet a quick sterilizing death.
    more...