• In this stunning vista, based on image data from the Hubble Legacy Archive, distant galaxies form a dramatic backdrop for disrupted spiral galaxy Arp 188, the Tadpole Galaxy. The cosmic tadpole is a mere 420 million light-years distant toward the northern constellation Draco. Its eye-catching tail is about 280 thousand light-years long and features massive, bright blue star clusters. One
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  • It was the largest hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean. The cost of its devastation is still unknown. Pictured above is a movie of Superstorm Sandy taken by the Earth-orbiting GOES-13 satellite over eight days in late October as the hurricane formed, gained strength, advanced across the Caribbean, moved up the Atlantic Ocean along the US east coast, made
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  • This image shows a “bite mark” where NASA’s Curiosity rover scooped up some Martian soil. The first scoop sample was taken from the “Rocknest” patch of dust and sand on Oct. 7, 2012, the 61st sol, or Martian day, of operations. A third scoop sample was collected on Oct. 15, or Sol 69, and deposited into the Chemistry and Mineralogy
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  • Why is this moon shaped like a smooth egg? The robotic Cassini spacecraft completed the first flyby ever of Saturn’s small moon Methone in May and discovered that the moon has no obvious craters. Craters, usually caused by impacts, have been seen on every moon, asteroid, and comet nucleus ever imaged in detail — until now. Even the Earth and
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  • Why does one half of Dione have more craters than the other? Start with the fact that Saturn‘s moon Dione has one side that always faces Saturn, and one side that always faces away. This is similar to Earth’s Moon. This tidal locking means that one side of Dione always leads as the moon progresses in its orbit, while the
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  • Are those UFOs near that mountain? No — they are multilayered lenticular clouds. Moist air forced to flow upward around mountain tops can create lenticular clouds. Water droplets condense from moist air cooled below the dew point, and clouds are opaque groups of water droplets. Waves in the air that would normally be seen horizontally can then be seen vertically,
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  • A Full Moonset can be a dramatic celestial sight, and Full Moons can have many names. Late October’s Full Moon, the second Full Moon after the northern hemisphere autumnal equinox, has been traditionally called the Hunter’s Moon. According to lore, the name is a fitting one because this Full Moon lights the night during a time for hunting in preparation
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  • At the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, a mere 27,000 light-years away, lies a black hole with 4 million times the mass of the Sun. Fondly known as Sagittarius A* (pronounced A-star), the Milky Way’s black hole is fortunately mild-mannered compared to the central black holes in distant active galaxies, much more calmly consuming material around it. From time
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  • Described as a “dusty curtain” or “ghostly apparition”, mysterious reflection nebula VdB 152 really is very faint. Far from your neighborhood on this Halloween Night, the cosmic phantom is nearly 1,400 light-years away. Also catalogued as Ced 201, it lies along the northern Milky Way in the royal constellation Cepheus. Near the edge of a large molecular cloud, pockets of
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  • Oh what a tangled web a >planetary nebula can weave. The Red Spider Planetary Nebula shows the complex structure that can result when a normal star ejects its outer gases and becomes a white dwarf star. Officially tagged NGC >6537, this two-lobed symmetric planetary nebula houses one of the hottest white dwarfs ever observed, probably as part of a >binary
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