spacer
 
Advanced Search
Astrobiology Magazine Facebook  Astrobiology Magazine Twitter
Tethys Behind Titan
01/27/10
What's that behind Titan? It's another of Saturn's moons: Tethys. The robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn captured the heavily cratered Tethys slipping behind Saturn's atmosphere-shrouded Titan late last year. The largest crater on Tethys, Odysseus, is easily visible on the distant moon. Titan shows not only its thick and opaque orange lower atmosphere, but also an unusual upper layer of blue-tinted haze. Tethys, at about 2 million kilometers distant, was twice as far from Cassini as was Titan when the above image was taken. In 2004, Cassini released the Hyugens probe which landed on Titan and provided humanity's first views of the surface of the Solar System's only known lake-bearing moon. Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA
Tethys Behind Titan
Add to My Astro


 

Previous | 1391-1400 | 1401-1410 | 1411-1420 | 1421-1430 | 1431-1440 | 1441-1450 | 1451-1460 | 1461-1470 | 1471-1480 | 1481-1490 | 1491-1500 | Next  

 

 

 

About Us
Contact Us
Links
Sitemap
Podcast Rss Feed
Daily News Story RSS Feed
Latest News Story RSS Feed
Learn more about RSS
Chief Editor & Executive Producer: Helen Matsos
Copyright © 2014, Astrobio.net