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Mars Phoenix
This image was acquired by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 24 (June 19, 2008). The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. The "dump pile" is located at the top of the trench, the side farthest away from the lander. This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University/NASA Ames
Viewed: 1552 times
01/14/09
These color images were acquired by the Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sols 20 and 24 (June 15 and 19, 2008). These images show sublimation of ice in the trench informally called "Dodo-Goldilocks" over the course of four days. In the lower left corner of the left image, a group of lumps is visible. In the right image, the lumps have disappeared, similar to the process of evaporation. Image credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 1757 times
01/14/09
This microscopic view of fine-grained material at the tip of the Robotic Arm scoop was provided by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on June 20, 2008, the 26th martian day, or sol, of the mission. RAC scientists took this image at a resolution of 30 microns by rotating the scoop to within 11 millimeters of the camera's front lens and refocusing the camera to macro focus. The image shows small clumps of fine, fluffy, red soil particles collected in a sample called 'Rosy Red.' The sample was dug from the trench named 'Snow White' in the area called 'Wonderland.' Some of the Rosy Red sample was delivered to Phoenix's Optical Microscope and Wet Chemistry Laboratory for analysis. Image Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.
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01/14/09
This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007. Image credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
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01/14/09
This image shows a microscopic view of fine-grained material at the tip of the Robotic Arm scoop as seen by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on June 20, 2008, the 26th martian day, or sol, of the mission. RAC scientists took this image at a resolution of 30 microns by rotating the scoop to within 11 millimeters of the camera's front lens and refocusing the camera to macro focus. The image shows small clumps of fine, fluffy, red soil particles collected in a sample called 'Rosy Red.' The sample was dug from the trench named 'Snow White' in the area called 'Wonderland.' Some of the Rosy Red sample was delivered to Phoenix's Optical Microscope and Wet Chemistry Laboratory for analysis. The RAC provides its own illumination, so the color seen in RAC images is color as seen on Earth, not color as it would appear on Mars. The image behind the RAC animation, taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager also on Sol 26, provides context. RAC Image NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute. Surface Stereo Imager Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech /University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
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01/14/09

This series of six images from the Robotic Arm Camera on Phoenix records the first time that the four spikes of the lander's thermal and electrical conductivity probe were inserted into martian soil. The images were taken on July 8, 2008, during the Phoenix mission's 43rd Martian day, or sol, since landing. The insertion visible from the shadows cast on the ground on that sol was a validation test of the procedure. The spikes on the probe are about 1.5 centimeters or half an inch long. The science team will use the probe tool to assess how easily heat and electricity move through the soil from one spike to another. Such measurements can provide information about frozen or unfrozen water in the soil. The probe is mounted on the "knuckle" of Phoenix's Robotic Arm. It has already been used for assessing water vapor in the atmosphere when it is held above the ground. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute
Viewed: 952 times
01/14/09
This image was acquired by the Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 44th martian day of the mission, or Sol 43 (July 7, 2008), and shows the current sample scraping area in the trench informally called "Snow White." Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 931 times
01/14/09
This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on Phoenix, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule martian soil particles. The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep. This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008. Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer. Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/University of Neuchatel.
Viewed: 961 times
01/14/09
Midnight Sun on Mars. This panorama mosaic of images was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This mosaic documents the midnight sun during several days of the mission. The foreground and sky images were taken on Sol 54, or the 54th martian day of the mission (July 20, 2008). The solar images were taken between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m., local solar time, during the nights of sols 46 to 56. During this period of 11 sols, the sun's path got slightly lower over the northern horizon, causing the lack of smoothness to the curve. This pan captures the polar nature of the Phoenix mission in its similarity to time lapse pictures taken above the Arctic Circle on Earth. Photo credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 1029 times
01/14/09
This animation consists of two close-up images of "Snow Queen," taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander. Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15 and July 9, 2008. Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute
Viewed: 890 times
01/14/09

After rasping "Snow White" trench on sol 60. Most of the 16 holes left by the rasp placements are visible in the central area. A total of 3 cubic centimeters, or half a teaspoon, of material was collected in the scoop. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 927 times
01/14/09
This partial view of a full-circle panorama shows NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander and the polygonal patterning of the ground at the landing area. The image is in approximately true color. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 963 times
01/14/09
This image taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager shows the current trenches, labeled Dodo-Goldilocks and Snow White, and the areas identified for future digging, labeled Cupboard and Neverland. Image NASA/ JPL-Caltech/ University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Viewed: 937 times
01/14/09
This image was acquired by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 8, 2008, the 43rd martian day after landing. This image shows the trench informally called "Snow White." Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample, taken from the surface area just left of the trench, was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Lab on June 25. The second sample was taken from the center of the "Snow White" trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Lab on July 6. Image credit: NASA/J PL-Caltech/ University of Arizona/Texas A&M University
Viewed: 969 times
01/14/09
An artist´ rendering of the Phoenix lander. Phoenix is searching for signs of habitability in the martian northern plains. Credit: NASA/JPL
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01/14/09

A prototype of a wet chemistry lab (WCL) beaker. Electrochemical sensors can be seen embedded in the sides of the beaker. Phoenix has four WCL beakers, two of which have already been used. Credit: NASA/JPL
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01/14/09
: A 3D rendering of a perchlorate ion, which contains one chlorine atom (green) and four oxygen atoms (red).
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01/14/09
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01/14/09
The Phoenix lander has recovered soil from trenches as deep as 12 inches below the martian surface, to determine whether the chemical makeup of the soil varies with depth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech//University of Arizona/Texas A&M University
Viewed: 629 times
01/14/09
TECP
Viewed: 329 times
05/23/09

Frost
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05/23/09
Droplets
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05/23/09
Phoenix
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06/03/09
Phoenix2
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06/03/09
PhoenixCleanRoom
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10/14/09

PhoenixLander
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11/15/09
PhoenixTrench
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11/15/09
Phoenix Lander Image
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02/11/10
Phoenix Scoop
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05/14/10
PhoenixDamage
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05/25/10

PhoenixPanel
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05/25/10
Phoenix Ice dig
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06/03/10
Phoenix Instruments
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09/10/10
Phoenix deployment
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10/16/10
Phoenix landing sequence
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04/03/11

The Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on Mars Phoenix after delivery of perchlorate containing martian soil. The Wet Chemical Laboratory is on the left side of the MECA instrument package. There are four individual wet chemical sample cells, the sample inlet funnels for each cell can be seen on the far left. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona
Viewed: 25 times
11/20/13
Artist's conception of Mars Phoenix at twilight. Credit: NASA/JPL-Calech/University of Arizona
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11/20/13
Mars One proposes concept based on NASA’s Phoenix-like lander for first privately funded mission to the Red Planet slated to blastoff in 2018. This film solar array experiment would provide additional power. Credit: Mars One
Viewed: 21 times
12/13/13
3 Footpads of Phoenix Mars Lander atop Martian Ice: Phoenix thrusters blasted away Martian soil and exposed water ice. Proposed Mars One 2018 mission will build a new Phoenix-like lander from scratch to test technologies for extracting water into a useable form for future human colonists. NASA’s InSight 2016 mission will build a new Phoenix-like lander to peer deep into the Red Planet and investigate the nature and size of the mysterious Martian core. Credit: Ken Kremer, Marco Di Lorenzo, Phoenix Mission, NASA/JPL/UA/Max Planck Institute
Viewed: 18 times
12/13/13
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