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Return to the Moon
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magnificent-desolation
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Apollo 17 astronauts Dr. H. Jack Schmitt and Gene Cernan took this image of
the Moon's Taurus-Littrow valley. The view shows the lunar roving vehicle
near the rim of Shorty crater. In the distance are the mountain-like massifs
that define the Taurus-Littrow valley. This region marks the last time -
December 1972 - that humans walked and drove on the Moon's surface.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Garvin (NASA/GSFC)
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01/14/09
Hubble reveals potential titanium oxide deposits at Aristarchus and
Schroter's Valley rille. Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Garvin (NASA/GSFC)
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01/14/09
This image showcases Hubble Space Telescope's first high-resolution ultraviolet
and visible imaging of the Apollo 17 landing region within the Taurus-Littrow valley
of the Moon. Humans last walked and drove on the lunar surface in this
region (marked + in the image at left and lower right) in December 1972.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Garvin (NASA/GSFC)
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01/14/09
The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaged
Aristarchus crater and nearby Schroter's Valley rille on Aug. 21, 2005.
The Hubble images reveal fine-scale details of the crater's interior
and exterior in ultraviolet and visible wavelengths at a scale of
approximately 165 to 330 feet (50 to 100 meters) per picture element.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Garvin (NASA/GSFC)
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Bernard Foing, chief scientist for ESA's SMART-1 lunar mission. Photo Credit: Leslie Mullen.
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Lunar Prospector with the Trans-Lunar Injection (TLI) stage.
Credit: NASA
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NASA AMES APOLLO RESEARCH
Apollo capsule Free flight Ablation Test (Test-9, Run-11 and Run-13) for blunt body re-entry studies (August 20, 1963)
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01/14/09
Plato and the lunar Alps, photographed by Alan Friedman of Buffalo, New York.
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The lunar Alps border the moon's Sea of Rains. The dark oval labeled "Olympic Village" is Plato. Credit: NASA
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Larry Toups in front of a lunar habitation mockup, and holding a model of the same structure
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Robert Scott's Hut in Antarctica, with McMurdo station in the background
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LCROSS ready to separate
Image Credit: NASA
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LCROSS enroute to moon, EDUS heading-in, and LCROSS plume developing with S-SC looking outward as well as down. Image Credit: NASA
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LCROSS plume developing with S-SC looking down. Image Credit: NASA
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The Human Powered Centrifuge (HPC) was developed as a research tool to provide exercise and gravitational forces (up to 5 G) simultaneously using only human effort. The HPC is powered with a pedal mechanism and is used to obtain physiological, psychological, and human performance data for the life science community. Credit: Ames CGBR
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01/14/09
The 20-G Centrifuge is used to evaluate flight hardware as well as to test the effects of hypergravity on humans and nonhuman subjects. The 20-G Centrifuge is capable of producing forces up to 20 times that of terrestrial gravity. The maximum G level attainable is dependent upon the mass of the specific payload. Credit: Ames CGBR
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01/14/09
Calle's device rapidly throws off simulated martian dust in a laboratory test at the Kennedy Space Center. Credit: NASA
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Prof. Senichi Masuda's diagram of the original "electric curtain," circa 1971. Credit: NASA
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A tiny, jagged speck of moondust. Micro-photograph courtesy of David McKay, NASA/JSC.
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Aquanaut Dr. Dave Williams wears an ambulatory monitoring system (sensor vest) to collect physiological data and an Actiwatch (light/motion sensor in a yellow wristband) to monitor his sleep-wake activity patterns and light exposure during the mission. Performance data was collected while aquanauts participated in other activities like observing the remotely-operated vehicle that was being driven by Mission Control in Houston. Credit: NSBRI
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NEEMO-9 astronaut/aquanaut Nicole P. Stott and University of Cincinnati physician Tim Broderick perform survey and mapping activities to record the coordinates of landmarks of interest around Aquarius during an EVA. Throughout the mission, NSBRI researchers used the under-sea experience as a model for studying performance ability, problem-solving and team cohesion issues that could affect long-duration space flights. Credit: NSBRI
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Possible impact projection for SMART-1. Credit: ESA
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SMART-1 artist's impression. Credit: ESA
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Aquarius was reconditioned in 1996 and redeployed to the Florida Keys in 1997. The inset photo shows the laboratory on the dock before it was towed out to sea and placed in its current position at Conch Reef. Credit: NASA
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Crew members for the ninth NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission arrive at their underwater home. The crew begins its April 3-20 stay inside the Aquarius Underwater Laboratory off the coast of Key Largo, Florida. Canadian astronaut Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams will lead the crew of four, which includes astronauts Ronald J. Garan Jr. and Nicole P. Stott, and University of Cincinnati physician Tim Broderick. NEEMO 9 is a cooperative project of NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) and the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery in Canada. (Image credit: NASA)
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Two NEEMO-9 crewmembers participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) for the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) project. During today´ EVA, astronaut/aquanauts Dafydd R. (Dave) Williams and Ronald J. Garan Jr. performed various tasks in a reconfigurable center of gravity backpack to simulate moon walking. The crew is spending 18 days, April 3-20, on an undersea mission aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration´ (NOAA) Aquarius Underwater Laboratory, located off the coast of Key Largo, Florida. Credit: NASA
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Crew members for the ninth NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission prepare for their April 3-20 stay inside the Aquarius Underwater Laboratory off the coast of Key Largo, Florida. Canadian astronaut Dafydd (Dave) R. Williams leads the crew of four, which includes astronauts Ronald J. Garan Jr. and Nicole P. Stott, and University of Cincinnati physician Tim Broderick. NEEMO 9 is a cooperative project of NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (UNCW) and the Centre for Minimal Access Surgery in Canada. (Image credit: NASA)
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During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Earth and Moon. Separate images of the Earth and Moon were combined to generate this view. Credit: NASA/JPL.
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Artist's representation of the impact event that resulted in the Earth-moon system. Image copyright: Fahad Sulehria, 2005, www.novacelestia.com
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Model of moon forming event over time (50 hours). In the most violent collisions, most of the impactor is vaporised and no moon is formed. Image: K Wada et al/ApJ.
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Evidence of lunar volcanism -- the dark basaltic plain of Mare Imbrium. Image from the Apollo 15 Command Module Sim Bay Mapping Camera.
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Lunar meteorite MAC88105. Found at the MacAlpine Hills Icefield in 1989. The black cube in the lower left is 1 cm across.
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Remote-sensing instruments on SMART-1 scan the Moon's surface. Credit: ESA
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This image, taken by the Advanced Moon Imaging Experiment (AMIE) on board ESA´ SMART-1 spacecraft, provides an –oblique´ view of the lunar surface towards the limb, around the Mezentsev, Niepce and Merrill craters, on the far side of the Moon. AMIE obtained this sequence on 16 May 2006. The imaged area is centred at a latitude of 73º North and a longitude of 124º West. Credits: ESA/Space-X
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Mineralogy map of Lacus Excellentiae on the Moon, showing the nominal SMART-1 impact orbit (central black line: orbit 2890) and possible impact location. The two adjecent orbits, 2889 and 2891, and their perilune locations are also indicated. Note that 1 degree of latitude corresponds to 30 km on the Moon, and that one arcsec from Earth subtends 1.8 km on the Moon centre.
Credit: ESA & Clementine Project, BMDO, NRL, LLNL
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Artist's impression of SMART-1 leaving Earth for the Moon
Credit: ESA
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This mosaic digitally stitches together 15 high resolution images of the Moon and a representative background star field. The color differences along the lunar surface are highly exaggerated, corresponding to regions with different chemical compositions. Image credit: Noel Carboni.
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