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Moon To Mars
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01/14/09
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01/14/09
The moon's crater Dawes, about 10 miles in diameter, is left of center and just north of the equator on the face of the moon (NASA photo)
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01/14/09
Alcoves and channels on the moon's crater Dawes (NASA photo)
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01/14/09

Harrison "Jack" Schmitt, the geologist who walked on the moon.
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01/14/09
Jack Schmitt on the moon, Apollo 17.
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01/14/09
"If you found nitrogen in abundance on Mars, you would get extremely excited because it shouldn´t be there," said USC College professor Kenneth Nealson. Credit: USC
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01/14/09
From left to right, authors Paula Bennett, Noelle Cutter and Betsy Sutherland. Not pictured, Guangming Zhou. Credit: BNL
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01/14/09
International Space Station Credit: NASA
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01/14/09

Millie Hughes-Fulford, PhD. Credit: UCSF
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01/14/09
JPL engineers tested Athlete, an All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer vehicle, in the Arizona desert. The robotic vehicle is capable of "walking" over extremely rough or steep terrain. Credit: NASA JPL
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01/14/09
A Centaur removes packed samples from the SCOUT (Science, Crew, Operations and Utility Testbed) rover. Credit: NASA
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01/14/09
In one scenario of the Desert Research and Technology Studies in the Arizona desert, a test subject returns to a mock way station. Credit: NASA
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01/14/09
Centaur Assists Athlete With a Tether Hook Credit: NASA JSC
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01/14/09

The Hubble Space Telescope snapped this sharp picture of Mars in March 1997. (Photo:NASA)
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01/14/09
Earthrise over Plaskett crater. Credit: ESA
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Crater Plaskett seen by SMART-1's camera. Credit: ESA
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01/14/09
Human explorers on Mars may one day help in the search for signs of past
or present life on the Red Planet.
Credit: ESA
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01/14/09
A graph of the predicted lunar exposure to charging by the plasmasheet over the
years 1960 to 2030. The red trace shows the monthly exposure, which also varies
with the seasons (peaking in June and December). The blue line is a smoothed curve
that highlights the 18 year cycle.

Credit: Dr. Mike Hapgood/Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
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01/14/09

An animation of the Moon (the small white circle) crossing the magnetospheric tail (the blue circle) around Christmas 2007 (the time is shown at the upper left). The view is from the Earth looking away from the Sun. The Moon crosses from right to left and occasionally encounters the plasmasheet (red). The two distance scales are in units of multiples of the radius of the Earth (Re). Credit: Dr. Mike Hapgood/Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
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01/14/09
An artificial magnetosphere could be generated around manned space craft
en route to the Moon or Mars to protect the occupants from the
potentially lethal radiation in space from the Sun. A superconducting
ring on board such a space craft could produce a magnetic field, or
mini-magnetosphere, similar to the Earth's, which would create a Star
Trek like 'deflector or plasma shield'.
Credit: RAS
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01/14/09
University of Arkansas researchers have received a NASA instrumentation grant to build a probe for planetary rovers.
Credit: University of Arkansas
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01/14/09
In an experiment conducted in the United Kingdom, a rose was grown under simulated martian conditions. credit: c-lab
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01/14/09
A researcher at an infectious disease containment facility wears a biohazard suit connected to a filtered air source.
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01/14/09

A conceptual image of a lunar base. credit: NASA/JSC
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01/14/09
The Mars Arctic Research Station, a simulated martian habitat on Devon Island in the Canadian arctic. credit: Mars Society
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Humans on Mars will be restricted to exploring areas that have no potential to harbor life.
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01/14/09
Dava Newman models her Biosuit on Henry Moore's sculpture "Reclining
Figure" on the MIT campus.
Credit: Donna Coveney / MIT
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01/14/09
K10 Red and it's companion robot K10 Black are using 3-D laser scanners and
ground-penetrating radar to help survey the Haughton Crater in Canada.
Credit: NASA Ames Research Center
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01/14/09

KT Red can be seen here driving in front of the Haughton-Mars Project Base Camp. The isolated
polar desert in Haughton Crater serves as a research sight for a number of Mars
analog studies, including simulating human Mars missions from the Mars Project's
base.
Credit: NASA Ames Research Center
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01/14/09
"Drill Hill" in Haughton Crater (Devon Island, Canada).
Credit: NASA Ames Research Center
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01/14/09
NEEMO 13 aquanaut, astronaut Richard Arnold, performs the Psychomotor Vigilance Test
(PVT), a three-minute test which measures vigilance, attention and psychomotor
speed. The PVT is taken at least four times a day –” on waking, before and after
simulated moon walks, dives and habitat experiments, and before bed.
Credit: National Space Biomedical Research Institute
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01/14/09
During NEEMO 12, veteran astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper is shown with a
Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT) device. Also visible on the table is a clear bag
for the daily saliva samples, which are used to measure cortisol, a hormone that
provides information on stress levels.
Credit: National Space Biomedical Research Institute
Viewed: 776 times
01/14/09
Scarab is designed to be agile enough to travel over the Moon's dusty, rocky
surface. The rover will also serve as a stabile drilling platform in a location
where gravity is only one sixth that of Earth.
Credit: Carnegie Mellon University
Viewed: 639 times
01/14/09

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