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Cassini-Huygens
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This unprocessed image was taken during Cassini's close approach to Enceladus on July 14, 2005.

The image was taken with the narrow angle camera from a distance of approximately 22,710 kilometers (14,110 miles) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 50 degrees degrees. Resolution in the image is about 130 meters (440 feet) per pixel.
Credit: CICLOPS
Viewed: 1017 times
01/14/09
This unprocessed image was taken during Cassini's close approach to Enceladus on July 14, 2005.

The image was taken with the narrow angle camera from a distance of approximately 103,230 kilometers (64,140 miles) from Enceladus and at a Sun-Enceladus-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 50 degrees degrees. Resolution in the image is about 610 meters (2,020 feet) per pixel.
Credit: CICLOPS
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Saturn's Moons banner
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Enceladus-Heat-map
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New ultraviolet images from Cassini spacecraft show auroral emissions at Saturn's poles. Credit: CU-Boulder
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Image left: Saturn's moon Enceladus is only 505 kilometers (314 miles) across, small enough to fit within the length of the United Kingdom, as illustrated here. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

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This graphic shows Cassini's path, or ground track, as it crossed over the surface of Enceladus near the time of closest approach during the flyby on July 14, 2005.
The ground track is indicated by a yellow line, marked by increments of 10 seconds before and after closest approach (C/A). The spacecraft came within 175 kilometers (109 miles) from the surface of Enceladus at closest approach.
The red contour encloses the region on Enceladus around the south pole that is the approximate boundary of the warm region as measured by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument on Cassini.
Credit: CICLOPS
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New images provided by the visual infrared mapping spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft reveal a diverse array of clouds in the depths of Saturn. Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.
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These three images, taken over a span of 27 minutes, show a few faint, narrow spokes in the outer B ring. The spokes are about 3,500 kilometers (2,200 miles) long and about 100 kilometers (60 miles) wide. The motion of the spokes here is from left to right. They are seen just prior to disappearing into the planet´ shadow on the rings.
Credit: CICLOPS
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This stunning false-color view of Hyperion reveals crisp details and differences in color across the strange, tumbling moon´ surface that could represent differences in the composition of surface materials. The view was obtained during Cassini´ very close flyby on September 26, 2005.
Credit: CICLOPS
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The northern polar region of Tethys, seen in this Cassini flyby image, is a ponderously ancient surface.
Above the prominent peaked crater Telemachus are the remnants of a very old crater (at the 10 o´clock position relative to Telemachus) named Teiresias. The ancient impact site is so badly overprinted and eroded by impact weathering and degradation that all that remains is a circular pattern of hummocks that mark where the old crater rim existed.
Credit: CICLOPS
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This view of Tethys´ surface, taken during Cassini´ close approach to the moon on September 24, 2005, reveals an icy land of steep cliffs. The view is of the southernmost extent of Ithaca Chasma, in a region not seen by NASA´ Voyager spacecraft.
Credit: CICLOPS
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These false color images show evidence of changing weather patterns in the skies over Titan's southern hemisphere. Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer took the images during two recent flybys. In the first image (left), taken Oct. 26, 2004, Titan's skies are cloud-free except for a patch of clouds over the south pole near the bottom of the image. In contrast the image at right, taken Dec. 13, 2004, shows extensive patches of clouds formed over temperate latitudes. (Photo: University of Arizona/JPL/NASA)
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On the left, in color, is a composite of the imaging camera and infrared data (red areas are brighter and blue darker, as seen in infrared). On the right is the synthetic aperture radar image. The Huygens descent images are shown inset on the left image and outlined in yellow on the right. The magenta cross in both images shows the best estimate of the actual Huygens landing site. Credit: NASA
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This set of images show the areas mapped so far on Saturn's moon Titan by the Cassini Radar Mapper using its Synthetic Aperture Radar imaging mode and the location of the upcoming Oct. 28, 2005, Titan flyby. Credit: JPL
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A diagram of Saturn's rings illustrating the paths taken by the star Omicron Ceti during four recent occulatations observed by the Cassini spacecraft. Bars at each path show the amount of light that filtered through the rings at points along the occultation. Inset boxes illustrate the orientation of gravitational wakes relative to the direction from the spacecraft to the star at select points in the A ring.
Credits: The VIMS instrument is operated by the University of Arizona. Data analysis by P.D. Nicholson, M.M. Hedman (Cornell University). Inset diagrams by Heikki Salo, Oulu University.
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Astronomy professor Phil Nicholson and research associate Matt Hedman take Saturn for a spin outside the Space Sciences Building.
Jason Koski/Cornell University
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Looking back toward the sun brings out the thin haze that hovers 500 kilometers (310 miles) above Saturn's moon Titan.
Credit: NASA/JPL
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Jets of icy particles burst from Enceladus, taken on November 27, 2005. Credit: CICLOPS
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Recent Cassini images of Enceladus at high phase show the fountain-like sources of the fine spray of material that towers above the south polar region of Enceladus. The image was taken looking more or less broadside at the 'tiger stripe' fractures observed in earlier Enceladus images and shows discrete and small-scale plumes above the limb of the moon.
Credit: CICLOPS
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The color-coded image of Enceladus was processed to enhance faint signals, making contours in the plume of material even more apparent. The greatly enhanced and colorized image shows the enormous extent of the fainter, larger-scale component of the plume. Credit: CICLOPS
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The Huygens probe provides the first detailed study of the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, revealing parallels –” and contrasts –” with Earth. Both atmospheres are nitrogen-dominated, but the low temperature of Titan means that the carbon-carrying gas in its atmosphere is methane (1.6% of the total) rather than carbon dioxide (present at only 345 parts per million). Photochemical reactions involving this methane produce a smog at middle altitudes, and an organic rain of methane and nitrogen-containing aerosols falls onto the satellite's surface, creating an Earth-like terrain of extended river networks. Radiogenic argon (40Ar), which makes up 1% of Earth's atmosphere, is in short supply on Titan (just 43 parts per million). The still smaller amount of primordial argon (36Ar) suggests the nitrogen in the atmosphere must have arrived in the form of compounds such as ammonia, rather than as molecular nitrogen. Credit: Nature
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Enceladus Plume: Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer measured the spectrum of the plumes originating from the south pole of the icy moon. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
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Titan's purple haze. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Methane clouds appear where predicted at south pole of Titan.
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Cloud tops of Titan seen from 338 925 kilometres, near closest approach.
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Artist's representation of the Huygens porbe on the surface of Titan. Image credit: ESA.
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This artist concept shows how Cassini is able to detect radio signals from lightning on Saturn. Lightning strokes emit electromagnetic energy across a broad range of wavelengths, including the visual wavelengths we see and long radio wavelengths that cause static on an AM radio during a thunderstorm. Some of the radio waves propagate upwards and can be detected at long distances by the radio and plasma wave science instrument on Cassini. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Iowa
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This image shows a rare and powerful storm on the night side of Saturn.
Light from Saturn's rings (called "ringshine") provided the illumination, allowing the storm and other cloud features to be seen. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The white surface of Enceladus is composed of relatively clean water-ice. Below Enceladus are the rings of Saturn, seen nearly edge on. Compared to Enceladus, Saturn's rings show their comparatively high density of dirt with their golden-brown color in this natural color image. The planet Saturn, in the background, appears featureless except for thin ring shadows visible on the upper left.
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA
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Saturn's B ring showing moonlets. Credit: Cornell
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The left image shows the B ring, Cassini Division, A ring and F ring, with the location of the propeller-shaped disturbances indicated. The center image is a closer view of the A ring, showing the radial locations where propeller features were spotted. In the right-hand image, the propellers appear as double dashes in the two close-up images. The unseen moonlets, each roughly the size of a football field, lie in the center of each structure. (The horizontal lines in the image represent electronic noise and do not correspond to ring features.) Credit: Cornell
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This circular feature might be an impact crater or a cryovolcanic caldera. Image credit: NASA/JPL
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This image of Saturn's moon Titan was taken by the European Space Agency's Huygens probe during its descent on Jan. 14, 2005. Image credit: ESA/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
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Image of Namibian sand dunes on Earth to compare with Cassini radar images of sand dunes on Saturn's giant moon Titan
Image credit: NASA/JSC
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Image above: Cassini radar sees sand dunes on Saturn's giant moon Titan. The bright features radar photo are not clouds but topographic features among the dunes.

Image credit: NASA/JPL
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This graphic illustrates the interior of Saturn's moon Enceladus. It shows warm, low-density material rising to the surface from within, in its icy shell (yellow) and/or its rocky core (red). Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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A view of Enceladus showing largely the southern hemisphere and the south polar terrain at the bottom of the image. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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The E ring, a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Cassini's ultraviolet imaging spectrograph observed the star Gamma Orionis as Enceladus crossed in front of the star. The light of the star dimmed as it was obscured by the atmosphere before being blocked entirely by Enceladus itself. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Colorado
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Saturn's E ring Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Cassini's powerful radar eyes have uncovered a geologic goldmine in a region called Xanadu on Saturn's moon Titan. Panning west to east, the geologic features include river channels, mountains and hills, a crater and possible lakes. Credit: NASA/JPL
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Titan shines beyond the rings like a brilliant ring of fire, its light gleaming here and there through the gaps in Saturn's magnificent plane of ice. Credit: NASA/JPL/ Space Science Institute
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A network of river channels is located atop Xanadu, the continent-sized region on Saturn's moon Titan. This radar image was captured by the Cassini Radar Mapper on April 30, 2006. Credit: NASA/JPL
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Saturn's two largest moons meet in the sky in a rare embrace. Smog-enshrouded Titan (5,150 kilometers, or 3,200 miles across) glows to the left of airless Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across). Credit: NASA/JPL/ Space Science Institute
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Cassini's powerful radar eyes have uncovered a geologic goldmine in a region called Xanadu on Saturn's moon Titan. The geologic features include river channels, mountains and hills, a crater and possible lakes. (Credit: NASA/JPL)
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Two radar images were acquired by the Cassini radar instrument in synthetic aperture mode on July 21, 2006. This image centered near 80 degrees north, 92 degrees west measures about 420 kilometers by 150 kilometers (260 miles by 93 miles). Credit: NASA/JPL
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Two radar images were acquired by the Cassini radar instrument in synthetic aperture mode on July 21, 2006. This image centered near 78 degrees north, 18 degrees west measures about 475 kilometers by 150 kilometers (295 miles by 93 miles). Smallest details in this image are about 500 meters (1,640 feet) across. Credit: NASA/JPL
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