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Interstellar
OrionMolecularCloud
Viewed: 501 times
09/15/09
PlanetForming
Viewed: 479 times
09/28/09
GalaxyStars
Viewed: 422 times
11/06/09
BowShock
Viewed: 468 times
11/06/09
RossiterMcLaughlin effect
Viewed: 473 times
11/17/09

RossiterMcLaughlin HATP7
Viewed: 375 times
11/17/09
SubaruDome
Viewed: 465 times
11/17/09
ProtoplanetaryWaterVapor
Viewed: 305 times
01/11/10
Bethell
Viewed: 270 times
01/11/10
SpitzerWaterVapor
Viewed: 312 times
01/11/10

Umbrella Galaxy
Viewed: 240 times
04/18/10
BP Piscium
Viewed: 240 times
09/15/10
BP Piscium Closeup
Viewed: 202 times
09/15/10
he surfaces of tiny interplanetary dust particles are space-weathered by the solar wind, causing amorphous rims to form on their surfaces. Hydrogen ions in the solar wind react with oxygen in the rims to form tiny water-filled vesicles (blue). This mechanism of water formation almost certainly occurs in other planetary systems with potential implications for the origin of life throughout the galaxy. Credit: John Bradley, UH SOEST/ LLNL.
Viewed: 10 times
02/03/14
WB57F aircraft, one of several planes used for Cosmic Dust collection in the stratosphere.
Viewed: 8 times
02/03/14

Oldest Know Star Discovered with SkyMapper Telescope. Dr. Stephen Keller is shown working in the SkyMapper Telescope at the Australian National University's Siding Spring Observatory. Credit: Martyn Pearce, ANU
Viewed: 9 times
02/17/14
Stefen Keller and Mike Bessell, The Australian National University. This image shows Dr. Stefen Keller and Professor Mike Bessell of the SkyMapper research team at The Australian National University. Credit: David Paterson, The Australian National University Usage Restrictions: None
Viewed: 14 times
02/17/14
One of the most distant galaxy clusters ever found. The image is made up of three colour Herschel images of the clumps identified by Planck. Credit: Dave Clements/ESA/NASA
Viewed: 13 times
02/17/14
Hubble measurements of the rotation of the Large Magellanic Cloud
Viewed: 11 times
02/22/14
A nearby star stands out in red in this image from the Second Generation Digitized Sky Survey. The star, called WISEA J204027.30+695924.1, was initially discovered using data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), which scanned the entire sky in infrared light in 2010 and early 2011, before ending its primary mission. Image credit: DSS/NASA/JPL-Caltech
Viewed: 10 times
03/12/14

Data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, has found no evidence for a hypothesized body sometimes referred to as "Planet X." This body was thought to be a large planet or small star orbiting in the far reaches of our solar system. Astronomers searched millions of images taken by WISE over the whole sky, finding no Saturn-like body out to a distance of 10,000 astronomical units (au) from the sun, and no Jupiter-like body out to 26,000 au. One astronomical unit equals 93 million miles. Earth is 1 au, and Pluto about 40 au, from the sun. This chart shows what types of objects WISE can and cannot see at certain distances from our sun. Bodies with larger masses are brighter, and therefore can be seen at greater distances. For example, if a Jupiter-mass planet existed at 10,000 au, WISE would have easily seen it. But WISE would not have been able to see a Jupiter-mass planet residing at 100,000 au -- it would have been too faint. Image credit: Penn State University
Viewed: 10 times
03/12/14
The third closest star system to the sun, called WISE J104915.57-531906, is at the center of the larger image, which was taken by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). It appeared to be a single object, but a sharper image (inset) from Gemini Observatory in Chile, revealed that it was binary star system, consisting of a pair of brown dwarfs. This is the closest star system to be discovered in nearly a century. The discovery was announced in March, 2013. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Gemini Observatory/AURA/NSF
Viewed: 14 times
03/12/14
This artist's concept shows two proplyds, or protostars, around a massive O-type star. The nearer proplyd is having its planet-forming dust and gas blasted away by the radiation from the star. The farther proplyd is able to retain its planet-making potential. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; B. Saxton
Viewed: 16 times
03/16/14
Gravitational waves from inflation generate a faint but distinctive twisting pattern in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, known as a "curl" or B-mode pattern. For the density fluctuations that generate most of the polarization of the CMB, this part of the primordial pattern is exactly zero. Shown here is the actual B-mode pattern observed with the BICEP2 telescope, which is consistent with the pattern predicted for primordial gravitational waves. The line segments show the polarization strength and orientation at different spots on the sky. The red and blue shading shows the degree of clockwise and anti-clockwise twisting of this B-mode pattern. BICEP2 Collaboration
Viewed: 12 times
03/17/14
The tiny temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (shown here as color) trace primordial density fluctuations in the early universe that seed the later growth of galaxies. These fluctuations produce a pattern of polarization in the CMB that has no twisting to it. Gravitational waves from inflation are expected to produce much a fainter pattern that includes twisting ("B-mode") polarization, consistent with the B-mode polarization pattern observed by BICEP2, which is shown here as black lines. The line segments show the polarization strength and orientation at different spots on the sky. BICEP2 Collaboration
Viewed: 10 times
03/17/14

The sun sets behind BICEP2 (in the foreground) and the South Pole Telescope (in the background). Steffen Richter (Harvard University)
Viewed: 7 times
03/17/14
The BICEP2 telescope's focal plane consists of 512 superconducting microwave detectors, developed and produced at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Anthony Turner (JPL)
Viewed: 10 times
03/17/14
Stars and planets are formed in interstellar gas clouds (a), where the gas and dust condense into the pre-stellar core (b) before forming a protostar and a proto-planetary disk (c). Ultimately the star begins to shine and planets form (d). To follow the whole process from beginning to end, the scientists have to deal not only with complex physical processes and chemistry, but also with orders of magnitude in density and temperature as well as vastly different timescales. [less] Credits: (a) NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/ESO/MPIA; (b) ESA/Herschel/SPIRE; (c) Douglas, Caselli et al. 2013; (d) NASA/JPL-Caltech
Viewed: 2 times
04/15/14
Observation of a water signature in the pre-stellar core L1544 in the constellation of Taurus. To produce such a large signal, the water vapour has to be liberated from icy dust grains by high-energy cosmic rays passing through the cloud. [less] Credit: ESA/ Herschel/SPIRE/HIFI/Caselli et al.
Viewed: 2 times
04/15/14
Molecules from the interstellar gas freeze onto cosmic dust grains, producing an ice coating. This changes not only the behaviour of the dust but might also serve as a water reservoir in later phases of planet formation.
Viewed: 2 times
04/15/14

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