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Biosphere
A single vascular bundle from a transverse section of the mature stem
Viewed: 91 times
12/19/12
Sabal causiarum
Viewed: 74 times
12/19/12
Nodules of ancient soil
Viewed: 86 times
01/17/13
Nostochopis multicellular cyanobacterium
Viewed: 82 times
01/19/13
Multicellular cyanobacterium
Viewed: 70 times
01/19/13

The depletion of ATP in cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli
Viewed: 62 times
01/26/13
A dung beetle
Viewed: 61 times
01/26/13
Dung beetle
Viewed: 65 times
01/26/13
Northern versus southern passage to the Fraser River in British Columbia
Viewed: 68 times
02/08/13
Sockeye salmon migrate
Viewed: 68 times
02/08/13

Sockeye salmon
Viewed: 67 times
02/08/13
Infected SAR11
Viewed: 76 times
02/14/13
Banksia spinulosa
Viewed: 75 times
02/14/13
Western Australian Biogeographic Regions
Viewed: 65 times
02/14/13
Methanococcus maripaludis from NCBI
Viewed: 59 times
03/07/13

Painted turtle
Viewed: 60 times
04/05/13
Underside of a painted turtle
Viewed: 54 times
04/05/13
Bean plant treated with hydrogen sulfide (top)
Viewed: 59 times
04/19/13
Bean seeds treated with hydrogen sulfide
Viewed: 55 times
04/19/13
Suctorian ciliate covered with symbiotic bacteria, along with diatoms, and filaments on weathered and cracked microplastic debris.
Viewed: 40 times
07/01/13

This is a typical glass sponge community in the Eastern Weddell sea
Viewed: 47 times
07/13/13
Fish (Trematomus sp.)
Viewed: 45 times
07/13/13
Researchers found zooplankton biomass to nearly equal phytoplankton in the upper ocean
Viewed: 41 times
07/22/13
The MAREDAT atlas catalogues marine plankton including single-celled animals such as this foraminifera, Hastigerina digitata.
Viewed: 38 times
07/22/13
Interpretive view of Diskagma buttonii with exterior view, left, and cross section
Viewed: 41 times
07/24/13

Diatoms and dinoflagellates from Lake Chuzenji in Japan.
Viewed: 43 times
07/24/13
Mushroom Omphalotus nidiformis
Viewed: 39 times
07/24/13
Yellow tube sponge (Aplysina fistularis), the purple vase sponge (Niphates digitalis), the red encrusting sponge (Spiratrella coccinea) and the gray rope sponge (Callyspongia)
Viewed: 36 times
07/24/13
Red-billed Quelea Quelea quelea flock
Viewed: 37 times
07/24/13
Machinery inside the chloroplasts
Viewed: 39 times
07/31/13

Fruit fly
Viewed: 30 times
08/14/13
Issus coleoptratus.
Viewed: 25 times
09/16/13
Researchers from Princeton University and the Swiss Institute of Technology in Zurich found that the wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of fertilizing nitrogen essential to the health of the ocean. The wobble, known as axial precession, causes an upwell of nitrogen-poor (but phosphorus-rich) water from the deep ocean roughly every 23,000 years. Blue-green algae such as Trichodesmium (above) feed on the phosphorous as they convert, or "fix," nitrogen in the air into a biologically active form that becomes part of the ocean's nitrogen cycle. (Image courtesy of the Center for Microbial Oceanography, University of Hawaii)
Viewed: 23 times
09/17/13
The reconstructed history of North Atlantic nitrogen fixation (black) is partly driven by the cyclic wobble of the Earth's axis of rotation (orange) and its effect on equatorial Atlantic upwelling.
Viewed: 24 times
09/17/13
A small carpenter bee.
Viewed: 19 times
10/28/13

Collared brown lemur (Eulemur fuvius collaris). Credit: Luke Dollar
Viewed: 22 times
10/30/13
A tiny jellyfish with green-glowing, fluorescent tentacles and red fluorescence in its body, owing to the chlorophyll in gobbled-up algae. Could we detect any evidence of intelligent signaling in such a creature if it were an alien species? Credit: Mikhail Matz, Islands in the Stream 2002, NOAA-OER
Viewed: 12 times
01/15/14
A termite mound photographed in Australia. Credit: Hansjoerg Morandell/Wikipedia
Viewed: 9 times
01/15/14
Giant honey bees, species Apis dorsata, photographed in India. The "waggle dance" of honeybees informs hivemates of the location of food. Credit: Bksimonb/Wikipedia
Viewed: 9 times
01/15/14
Georgia Tech assistant professor Kostas Konstantinidis (left) and former graduate student and study lead author Chengwei Luo examine E. coli cells. (Credit: Gary Meek)
Viewed: 6 times
01/22/14

Soil plots that were heated to simulate the rise in temperatures forecast by climate models. The radiators (top) warm the plots 2 degrees Celsius. (Credit: Mengting Yuan, U. of Oklahoma)
Viewed: 7 times
01/22/14
A Drosophila fly infected with fungus. Flies raised in space were unable to fight off fungal infections because defects in the immune system. Credit: Deborah Kimbrell/UC Davis photo
Viewed: 6 times
01/29/14
IceBridge Flight Over Baffin Island . Image Credit: NASA/Michael Studinger
Viewed: 6 times
01/29/14
This is Laflamme in his U of T Mississauga laboratory. Credit: Gareth Trickey
Viewed: 6 times
01/30/14
These are fossil remains of Ediacara biota. Credit: Courtesy of Marc Laflamme
Viewed: 6 times
01/30/14

These are digital images of trenches in a mineral made by networks of fungi. The circular feature in the picture on the right is a depression made by the formation of a terminal spore by a mycorrhizal fungus, which was linked to the roots of a maple tree under high CO2. Researcher Joe Quirk says: "These spores are characteristic of the ancient type of fungus that has associated with plant roots since plants first emerged onto the land over 400 million years ago. This is why the image is so exciting – it's good evidence this ancient fungus weathers minerals." The width of the trenches is approximately 5 micrometers and the diameter of the circular spore is about 55 micrometers (one micrometer is one-thousandth of a millimeter). Credit: Joe Quirk
Viewed: 5 times
01/30/14
The porcelain crab, or Petrolisthes cinctipes. Photo by Jonathon Stillman.
Viewed: 5 times
02/02/14
These porcelain crabs are at the beginning of their life cycle: a late-stage embryo (right) and a newly hatched larva (left). Photo by Jonathon Stillman.
Viewed: 5 times
02/02/14
Sea Anemone specime credit: Daly M, Rack F, Zook R (2013)
Viewed: 7 times
02/06/14
“Field” of Edwardsiella andrillae n. sp. in situ. Image captured by SCINI. Red dots are 10 cm apart. credit: Daly M, Rack F, Zook R (2013)
Viewed: 7 times
02/06/14

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