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New Planets
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) full-field Fe IX, X 171 Ã… images from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Viewed: 3394 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. White-light Mk. 4 coronameter images from the High Altitude Observatory Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (Hawaii)
Viewed: 2886 times
01/14/09
CoKu Tau/1. This image shows a newborn binary star system, CoKu Tau/1, lying at the center of four "wings" of light extending as much as 75 billion miles from the pair. The "wings" outline the edges of a region in the stars' dusty surroundings, which have been cleared by outflowing gas. A thin, dark lane extends to the left and to right of the binary, suggesting that a disk or ring of dusty material encircles the two young stars.
Viewed: 2671 times
01/14/09
I04016 - A very young star still deep within the dusty cocoon from which it formed is shown in this image of IRAS 04016+2610. The star is visible as a bright reddish spot at the base of a bowl-shaped nebula about 100 billion miles across at the widest point. The nebula arises from dusty material falling onto a forming circumstellar disk, seen as a partial dark band to the left of the star. The necklace of bright spots above the star is an image artifact.
Viewed: 2903 times
01/14/09
I04302 - This image shows IRAS 04302+2247, a star hidden from direct view and seen only by the nebula it illuminates. Dividing the nebula in two is a dense, edge-on disk of dust and gas which appears as the thick, dark band crossing the center of the image. The disk has a diameter of 80 billion miles (15 times the diameter of Neptune's orbit), and has a mass comparable to the Solar Nebula, which gave birth to our planetary system. Dark clouds and bright wisps above and below the disk suggest that it is still building up from infalling dust and gas.
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01/14/09

The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Earliest stage,the circumstellar disk is shown edge-on with the disk eclipsing the star.
Viewed: 2889 times
01/14/09
The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Earliest stage,the circumstellar disk is shown at a tilt halfway between edge-on.
Viewed: 2285 times
01/14/09
The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Earliest stage,the circumstellar disk is shown face-on.
Viewed: 2217 times
01/14/09
The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Later stage, the circumstellar disk is shown edge-on. The brightness of the young star has been de-emphasized to show details in the evolving planetary system.
Viewed: 2128 times
01/14/09
The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Later stage, the circumstellar disk is shown halfway tilted from edge-on. The brightness of the young star has been de-emphasized to show details in the evolving planetary system.
Viewed: 1959 times
01/14/09

The following illustration is an artist's conception of how gas and dust around a newborn star evolves into a planetary system. Later stage, the circumstellar disk is shown face-on, with planetary orbits as new ring structures The brightness of the young star has been de-emphasized to show details in the evolving planetary system.
Viewed: 2023 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) full-field Fe XII 195 Ã… images from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Viewed: 1946 times
01/14/09
Big blue marble, tiny pale dot--the clincher image of a biological planet discovered, beyond the capabilities of our galactic location and optics
Viewed: 1863 times
01/14/09
The Doppler shift caused by wobble in light curves of star with surrounding planets. In this instance Lick Observatory , 51 Pegasi-50 light years from Earth--0.051 AU from parent star to planet. In constellation, Pegasus, the star 51 Pegasi is a yellow dwarf similar in size and structure to the Earth's own Sun. Because of closeness to its parent, this was the first example of a 'hot Jupiter' in size and relative proximity.
Viewed: 2195 times
01/14/09
An image of the star Upsilon Andromedae. The newly discovered planets are not able to be seen, because of the overpowering brightness of the star. Image: Digital Sky Survey
Viewed: 1959 times
01/14/09

Centered,Gliese 876-15 light years from Earth--0.21 AU from parent star to planet. Notable as one of the closest discovered stars with planets 1.6 times as massive as Jupiter detected by Doppler wobble.
Viewed: 1996 times
01/14/09
Rho Coronae Borealis--57 light years from Earth--0.23 AU from parent star to planet
Viewed: 2170 times
01/14/09
Early Earth as the Sun-Earth equilibrium brought a habitable zone to biological productivity.
Viewed: 1936 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) full-field Fe XV 284 Ã… images from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Viewed: 1951 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. SOHO Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) full-field He II 304 Ã… images from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Viewed: 2064 times
01/14/09

Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. Soft X-ray Telescope
Viewed: 2280 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. Photospheric magnetograms from the U.S. National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak (Arizona)
Viewed: 2277 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. He I 10830 Ã… spectroheliograms from the U.S. National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak (Arizona)
Viewed: 2159 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. RISE/PSPT Ca II K filtergrams from HAO's Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (Hawaii)
Viewed: 2104 times
01/14/09
Our beautiful but unremarkable population I star--4.5 billion years old (stellar middle age), medium size and luminosity. Other than providing a habitable zone for Earth, it hosts 9 planets. SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) 6767 Ã… continuum images from Stanford University
Viewed: 2020 times
01/14/09

Upsilon Andromedae-57 light years from Earth--0.056 AU from parent star to planet. Distinction as first system of planets around star similar to our own Sun. Previously, only single planet star systems had been found. Credit: © Lynette Cook (used with permission of the artist), http://extrasolar.spaceart.org/extraso2.html
Viewed: 2273 times
01/14/09
Planetoid, Quaoar, beyond Pluto is an icy planet of crystalline water
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01/14/09
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01/14/09

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01/14/09
© David Egge (Artwork from Novaspace Galleries, used with permission from Novaspace)
View of Gliese 876 and a ringed Jupiter-class planet from an icy moon, as imagined by Egge
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01/14/09
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01/14/09

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01/14/09
This artist's concept shows the orbits of a triple-star system called HD 188753, which was discovered to harbor a gas giant, or "hot Jupiter," planet.
Viewed: 1849 times
01/14/09
trinary_sunset-top
Viewed: 1622 times
01/14/09
This artist's concept shows the view from a hypothetical moon in orbit around the first known planet to reside in a tight-knit triple-star system. The gas giant planet, discovered using the Keck I telescope atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii, zips around a single star that is orbited by a nearby pair of pirouetting stars.
Viewed: 2139 times
01/14/09
This artist's concept shows the planet catalogued as 2003UB313 at the lonely outer
fringes of our solar system. Our Sun can be seen in the distance. The new planet,
which is yet to be formally named, is at least as big as Pluto and about three times
farther away from the Sun than Pluto. It is very cold and dark. The planet was
discovered by the Samuel Oschin Telescope at the Palomar Observatory near San Diego,
Calif., on Jan. 8, 2005.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Viewed: 2199 times
01/14/09

Tenth-planet-banner
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01/14/09
sotorion
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01/14/09
The discovery of the moon of the 10th planet from the W.M. Keck Observatory. The planet appears in the center,
while the moon is the small dot at the 3 o'clock position. Credit: W.M. Keck Observatory
Viewed: 2204 times
01/14/09
Grover Swartzlander, associate professor in the University of Arizona's College of Optical Sciences, with a laboratory setup that checks an experimental optical vortex mask.
Viewed: 2910 times
01/14/09
Computed intensity of vortex coronagraph for a single color light source. The analytically derived distribution predicts there will be zero light across the central black disk. (Image courtesy of Grover Swartzlander, University of Arizona, Tucson College of Optical Sciences)
Viewed: 3035 times
01/14/09

Artist's conception of a "super-Earth" and hypothetical moon, orbiting a red dwarf star 9,000 light-years away. The 13-Earth-mass planet was detected by a search for microlensing events, in which the gravity of a foreground star distorts the light of a more distant background star. Credit: David A. Aguilar (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Viewed: 3878 times
01/14/09
Fig. 1 - Inward migration of a swarm of protoplanets. The protoplanets are represented by white circles, with size proportional to mass. The disc is coloured according to density: the brighter part is the denser region of the disc. Credit: Astronomy & Astrophysics
Viewed: 2384 times
01/14/09
An international team of professional and amateur astronomers, using simple off-the-shelf equipment to trawl the skies for planets outside our solar system, has hauled in its first "catch." The astronomers discovered a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting a Sun-like star 600 light-years from Earth in the constellation Corona Borealis. The team, led by Peter McCullough of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., includes four amateur astronomers from North America and Europe. This artist's impression shows a dramatic close-up of the extrasolar planet, called XO-1b, passing in front of a Sun-like star 600 light-years from Earth. The Jupiter-sized planet is in a tight four-day orbit around the star. Credit: NASA, ESA, and P. McCullough (STScI)
Viewed: 3380 times
01/14/09
Astronomers used this inexpensive telescope to find an extrasolar planet transiting the face of a Sun-like star 600 light-years from Earth. The telescope, which looks like a pair of binoculars, consists of two 200-millimeter telephoto camera lenses. The lenses are attached to electronic devices that measured slight dips in light output from the star, indicating that an object was crossing in front of it. The telescope is on the summit of the Haleakala volcano in Hawaii. Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Stys (STScI)
Viewed: 2033 times
01/14/09
Computer generated simulation of TrES-2. Credit: Jeffrey Hall, Lowell Observatory
Viewed: 1537 times
01/14/09

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