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Mars
Hostile landscape of Mars
Viewed: 72 times
07/08/13
Observations at large scales, such as panoramas of Martian landscapes, help researchers identify smaller-scale features of special interest for examination in more detail
Viewed: 54 times
07/09/13
The famous Martian meteorite ALH 84001 contains a "fossil" that was ruled out as life because of its small size, however it could still be an autocell - a precursor to life. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 24 times
09/22/13
Eden Patera basin on Mars could have been formed by an explosive volcanic eruption, not the impact of a large object
Viewed: 25 times
10/02/13
Above, the dark color indicates younger material draped across the Eden Patera depression.
Viewed: 21 times
10/02/13

Some clouds have been added to this illustration of Mars
Viewed: 24 times
10/09/13
The Nili Patera caldera on Mars, where evidence of hydrothermal mineral deposits has been found. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/JHU-APL/Brown Univ
Viewed: 17 times
11/07/13
The technique for finding virus fossils on Earth will need to be figured out before exporting the idea to Mars. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 20 times
11/07/13
The Martian moon Phobos has accumulated dust and debris from the surface of Mars, knocked into its orbital path by projectiles colliding with the planet. A sample-return mission to Phobos would thus return material both from Phobos and from Mars. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 20 times
11/12/13
At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 41, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or MAVEN, spacecraft is encapsulated atop an Atlas V rocket on November 18, 2013. Image credit: NASA
Viewed: 14 times
11/19/13

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft launches aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 1:28 p.m. EST on Monday, Nov. 18, 2013. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Viewed: 15 times
11/19/13
Asteroids passing near Mars. Image Credit: NASA
Viewed: 21 times
11/22/13
A panorama view of the "Rocknest" area on Mars visited by the NASA's Curiosity Rover in autumn 2012. Someday human explorers might comb Red Planet landscapes like this for evidence of life. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Malin Space Science Systems
Viewed: 24 times
12/06/13
This mosaic of images from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows a series of sedimentary deposits in the Glenelg area of Gale Crater, from a perspective in Yellowknife Bay looking toward west-northwest. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Viewed: 109 times
12/09/13
The hole that NASA's Curiosity Mars rover drilled into target rock "John Klein" provided a view into the interior of the rock, as well as obtaining a sample of powdered material from the rock. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Viewed: 41 times
12/09/13

This mosaic of images from Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) shows geological members of the Yellowknife Bay formation, and the sites where Curiosity drilled into the lowest-lying member, called Sheepbed, at targets "John Klein" and "Cumberland." Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Viewed: 86 times
12/09/13
This illustration depicts a concept for the possible extent of an ancient lake inside Gale Crater. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Viewed: 34 times
12/09/13
Images of locations in Gale Crater taken from orbit around Mars reveal evidence of erosion in recent geological times and development of small scarps, or vertical surfaces. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
Viewed: 20 times
12/09/13
Clay minerals are composed of layers. Water and cations (positive-charged ions) can be stored between these layers. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS
Viewed: 20 times
12/09/13
A patch of windblown sand and dust known as “Rocknest.”
Viewed: 16 times
12/11/13

Impacts on Mars could have resulted in glass sphericals that trapped any organics, if they existed. Credit: NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. Bell (Cornell University), and M. Wolff (Space Science Institute, Boulder)
Viewed: 17 times
12/13/13
Solar wind removing off Mars’ atmosphere. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 10 times
02/02/14
MAVEN will measure the process affecting the remaining atmosphere on Mars. These include incoming Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), escape on a molecule-by-molecule basis (Jeans Escape), the effect of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and extreme solar ultraviolent radiation (EUVs). Credit: Courtesy of the Lunar and Planetary Institute and LASP
Viewed: 11 times
02/07/14
Much of Mars's atmosphere likely disappeared into space as the planet lost the protection of its intrinsic magnetic field. Credit: NASA Visualization Explorer
Viewed: 9 times
02/13/14
The Day-Time Ionosphere on Mars. Courtesy of ESA
Viewed: 10 times
02/16/14

The EUV sensor. Courtesy of JPL
Viewed: 9 times
02/16/14
SWEA. Credit: Courtesy of LASP
Viewed: 8 times
02/16/14
Solar Wind Ion Analyzer or SWIA. Courtesy of LASP
Viewed: 7 times
02/16/14
Loss of Ionosphere and formation of the plasmasphere. Credit: Courtesy of NASA/LASP
Viewed: 8 times
02/16/14
Radiation environments on Earth and Mars. Credit: Courtesy of NASA JPL
Viewed: 8 times
02/21/14

Mars, a cross-section showing the large liquid core. Credit: NASA JPL
Viewed: 7 times
02/21/14
MARTE simulation chamber re-creates the Martian environment with the correct gas composition, UV radiation, temperatures 108K-423K and pressures in the range of 10-6 mbar. Credit: J. Martín-Gago/ICMM
Viewed: 5 times
04/03/14
Technical drawing of the MARTE. Credit: Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 035111 (2014); http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4868592
Viewed: 6 times
04/03/14
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