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Extreme Life and Environments
The Perito Moreno Glacier (Argentina). Scientists are trying to figure out under what circumstances global ice ages gripped the Earth in the last few billion years. Credit: Etienne Berthier, Université de Toulouse
Viewed: 14 times
01/15/14
Mountain ranges surround Mono Lake in California. Credit: University of Georgia
Viewed: 14 times
01/24/14
Cloud plumes from cracks of open water in the Arctic sea ice cover. Image credit: University of Hamburg, Germany
Viewed: 14 times
01/24/14
Transmission-electron microscope images of viruses from deep subseafloor sediments. The viruses attach themselves on the surface of microbes and inject their DNA into the cells, which start producing new viruses. Credit: ICBM-Uni Oldenburg
Viewed: 12 times
01/24/14
Scientists in Sallie (Penny) Chisholm's lab at MIT documented the first extracellular vesicles produced by ocean microbes. The arrow in the photo above points to one of these spherical vesicles in this scanning electron micrograph showing Prochlorococcus cyanobacteria. Credit: Steven Biller/Chisholm Lab
Viewed: 9 times
02/01/14

Scientists studying methane-producing microbes, like the ones found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents pictured here, discovered that a protein critical to photosynthesis likely developed on Earth long before oxygen became available. Credit: Photo courtesy of Chris Germen, WHOI/NSF, NASA/ROV Jason 2012, at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Viewed: 11 times
02/11/14
Aspartic Acid Racemization
Viewed: 7 times
02/21/14
Hydrothermal-vent ecosystems vs plant photosynthesis. Hydrothermal-vent ecosystems derive their energy from chemicals in a process called "chemosynthesis." In chemosynthesis, the hydrothermal vent acts an energy source (1) instead of the sun. Both processes use carbon dioxide (2) and water to produce sugars (3). As an end product, chemosynthesis produces sulfur (4) while photosynthesis generates oxygen. Credit: Image courtesy Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and NASA Science News
Viewed: 6 times
03/12/14
Shrimps, crab, and sea anenome flourishing near a vent in the Indian Ocean. Credit: Image courtesy Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and NASA Science News
Viewed: 8 times
03/12/14
This image shows a man standing in volanic steam in Antartica. Credit: Peter Convey, British Antartic Survey
Viewed: 5 times
03/12/14

Boulby International Subsurface Astrobiology Laboratory (BISAL) is a microbiology laboratory located in the Boulby Mine in Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Credit: UK Centre for Astrobiology
Viewed: 9 times
04/07/14

The research team, from right to left, co-authors Eoghan Reeves, Jill McDermott, and Jeff Seewald and their WHOI colleagues Frieder Klein and Sean Sylva used isobaric gas-tight samplers (IGTs) to collect and analyze samples of hydrothermal vent fluids (Jason pilot Scott Hansen peeks out from the background) on a cruise to the Cayman Trough in 2012. Seewald developed the samplers to collect fluids, some exceeding 700°F, and return them to the surface under pressure to preserve their physical and chemical composition. Credit: Julie Huber, copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Viewed: 7 times
04/12/14
To collect their samples, the researchers went to hydrothermal vent sites where the chemistry predicted they would find abundant methanethiol, and others where very little was predicted to form. In total, they measured the distribution of methanethiol in 38 hydrothermal fluids from multiple differing geologic environments including systems along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Guaymas Basin, the East Pacific Rise, and the Mid-Cayman Rise – an unprecedented survey - over a period between 2008 and 2012. Credit: Meg Tivey, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Viewed: 5 times
04/12/14
Making methanethiol from the chemicals available in hydrothermal black smoker fluids was thought to have been an easy process. To test this theory, the researchers collected fluids in isobaric gas-tight samplers (IGTs) from black smokers and analyzed them for the presence of methanethiol. Credit: Chris German, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Viewed: 4 times
04/12/14
Clear hot spring fluids spew from a talc structure at the Von Damm vent field, a mile and a half beneath the Caribbean Sea. The researchers show that fluids emanating from Von Damm and other hot spring areas around the global mid-ocean ridge system contain a sulfur compound, methanethiol, that is indicative of pyrolysed subsurface life. The red laser dots are 10cm apart, for scale. Photograph courtesy of the Little Hercules ROV, NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, Mid-Cayman Rise Expedition 2011. Credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Viewed: 5 times
04/12/14

Phosphatized Methanotrophs: Individual apatite particles in Karelian rocks commonly occur as cylinders that have consistent diameters (0.5-4 micrometers) and lengths (0.5-4 micrometers). Such characteristics are consistent with an origin from a biogenic precursor and hence are interpreted as fossilized methanotrophic archaea. Credit: Avio Lepland/Norges geologiske undersøkelse
Viewed: 2 times
04/14/14
Phosphatized S Bacterium: Round- to oval-shaped apatite-rich nodules in Karelian rocks. These are widespread and have diameters of c. 300-500 micrometers, which are sizes and shapes typical of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that mediate modern phosphogenesis and used as evidence supporting the interpretation that the ancient nodules represent phosphatized sulfur bacteria. Credit: Avio Lepland/Norges geologiske undersøkelse
Viewed: 2 times
04/14/14
Close-up view of Asbestopluma monticola, one of four new species of carnivorous sponges discovered off the West Coast of North America. Image: © 2006 MBARI
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04/22/14
A large group of Asbestopluma monticola sponges grow on top of a dead sponge on Davidson Seamount, off the Central California coast. Image: © 2006 MBARI
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04/22/14
This microscope image shows the carcass of a small crustacean (possibly a deep-sea amphipod) that was caught in the spines of one of the newly discovered carnivorous sponges, Cladorhiza evae. Image: (c) 2013 Henry Reiswig
Viewed: 0 times
04/22/14

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