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Extreme Life and Environments
The Atlantis crew shuttles additional members of the science party to the ship from the Gyre. Image courtesy of Expedition to the Deep Slope.
Viewed: 1588 times
01/14/09
A group of very old tubeworms (Lamellibrachia luymesi and Seepiophila jonesi) living on the same piece of carbonate rock as large colonies of the gorgonian Callogorgia Americana americana, with brittle stars and a galatheid crab crawling on the gorgonians.
Credit: Derk Bergquist
Viewed: 1284 times
01/14/09
A computer enhanced multibeam bathymetry map of the northwestern and northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf and slope. The continental slope surface reflects an array of intraslope basins, sites of thick accumulations of sediment, surrounded by higher relief features in the form of ridges and domes that are the expressions of salt masses in the shallow subsurface. Major lease areas established by the Minerals Management Service are superimposed on the image and important features like the Sigsbee Escarpment at the base of the slope are labeled.
Credit: Harry H. Roberts
Viewed: 1254 times
01/14/09
Chemoautotrophic whale-fall community, including bacteria mats, vesicomyid clams in the sediments, galatheid crabs, polynoids, and a variety of other invertebrates. The 35 ton gray whale was originally implanted on the seafloor at 1674 m depth in the Santa Cruz Basin in 1998. This image was captured 6 years later by Craig Smith from the University of Hawaii.
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01/14/09
A small orange crab near a few scattered tubeworm individuals at 2180 meters depth in Atwater Valley. Image courtesy of Expedition to the Deep Slope.

Viewed: 880 times
01/14/09

A unique glacial spring on northern Ellesmere Island in Canada´ High Arctic, just 9° south of Earth´ north pole. Credit: AINA
Viewed: 797 times
01/14/09
Vented Type I Container with fly cassette and air holes. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 804 times
01/14/09
The image shows Drosophila (fruit fly) larvae and adults. A "sensitized" background line with increased incidence of tumors will allow larvae to be irradiated on the ground and then sent into space to experience a microgravity environment. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 1200 times
01/14/09
Penny Boston collects rock and soil samples for laboratory analysis. Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 984 times
01/14/09
The circular depression in this rock may indicate that life is present even in the driest region of the Atacama Desert. Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 914 times
01/14/09

The gray veins in this salt rock from the Atacama Desert indicate the presence of photosynthetic bacteria.
Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 839 times
01/14/09
Jacek Wierzchos, the chemist who discovered bacteria living inside salt rocks in Yungay, Chile, the driest place on Earth. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 897 times
01/14/09
At dawn, after a particularly cold desert night, light and moisture enable photosynthetic bacteria to come to life inside salt rocks like this one.
Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 1088 times
01/14/09
Life has gained a foothold in the salar, or salt flat, that extends for several square miles behind the desert research station in Yungay, Chile.
Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 912 times
01/14/09
Life has gained a foothold in the salar, or salt flat, that extends for several square miles behind the desert research station in Yungay, Chile.
Credit: Henry Bortman
Viewed: 829 times
01/14/09

Credit: Justin B. Ries, Johns Hopkins University
Viewed: 705 times
01/14/09
Justin Ries Credit: Johns Hopkins University
Viewed: 811 times
01/14/09
Chris McKay searches for life in some of the driest places on Earth.
Viewed: 770 times
01/14/09
When the food supply dries up, solitary Dictyostelium discoideum cells congregate and fuse into a spore-producing tower. A newly discovered hybrid enzyme called Steely2 (shown in cartoon form) forges the basic structure of the chemical signal (DIF-1, shown here as a stick model) that orchestrates this vital step in the life cycle of Dictyostelium: the transformation of omnipotent cells into dedicated spore or stalk cells. Credit: Image by Mike Austin using a photo by Rob Kay
Viewed: 1615 times
01/14/09
Image of gram negative Salmonella typhimurium. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 763 times
01/14/09

Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 946 times
01/14/09
Image of Candida albicans. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 808 times
01/14/09
black smoker hydrothermal vent and tube worms
Viewed: 1280 times
01/14/09
Collecting sulfur spring samples are Marie-Eve Caron and Dahmnait Gleeson. Image credit: Stephen Grasby
Viewed: 831 times
01/14/09
Sulfur spring runs down the face of the glacier at Borup Fiord on Ellesmere Island. Image credit: Stephen Grasby
Viewed: 905 times
01/14/09

These close-up images, taken by an electron microscope, reveal tiny one-cell organisms called halophiles and methanogens. Studies show these microbes can survive at below-freezing temperatures and are within the temperature range on present-day Mars. Credit: Maryland Astrobiology Consortium, NASA and STScI
Viewed: 1323 times
01/14/09
The diagram shows where the photograph was taken with respect to the discovery. Image courtesy of Duane Moser.
Viewed: 728 times
01/14/09
About two miles below the ground in a South African gold mine, co-author Duane Moser stands next to the fracture zone (white area) where the one-of-a-kind bacteria were found. Image courtesy of Li-Hung Lin.
Viewed: 1074 times
01/14/09
Andrew Steele of the Carnegie Institution of Washington checks out the red beds from Sverrefjelle.
Image credit: AMASE
Viewed: 840 times
01/14/09
Diagram of the CheMin instrument.
Image credit: LANL
Viewed: 889 times
01/14/09

Svalbard
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01/14/09
Credit: Princeton University
Viewed: 644 times
01/14/09
Satellite photo of the Nile
Viewed: 607 times
01/14/09
In parts of Monterey Bay, sulfide seeps up through the muddy seafloor. Clams living in the mud absorb this toxic chemical through their feet. The clams carry the sulfide to bacteria living inside their bodies. The bacteria use the sulfide to make food, which in turn provides nutrients for the clams. These are having size upto 4 inches (10 cm) or larger. Credit: All the Sea
Viewed: 1030 times
01/14/09
This image shows gas hydrate forming beneath a rock ledge above a seafloor cold seep approximately 250 miles east of Charleston, S.C. Credit: Carolyn Ruppel
Viewed: 831 times
01/14/09

Salt-lovers : immense bloom of a halophilic ("salt-loving")
archaean species at a salt works near San Quentin, Baja California Norte, Mexico.
Credits: Berkeley
Viewed: 774 times
01/14/09
A New Domain : In the late 1970s, Dr. Carl Woese spearheaded a study of evolutionary relationships among prokaryotes. Instead of physical characters, he relied on RNA sequences to determine how closely related these microbes were. He discovered that the prokaryotes were actually composed of two very different groups -- the Bacteria and a newly recognized group that he called Archaea. Each of these groups is as different from the other as they are from eukaryotes. These three groups are now recognized as three distinct domains of life. Credits: Berkeley
Viewed: 844 times
01/14/09
Stromatolites in a pool at Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Photo credit: Tommy Lavergne of Rice University, Houston, Texas.
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01/14/09
Pool at Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Photo credit: Tommy Lavergne of Rice University, Houston, Texas
Viewed: 840 times
01/14/09
Stromatolites in a pool at Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Photo credit: Tommy Lavergne of Rice University, Houston, Texas
Viewed: 814 times
01/14/09

Valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Mexico. Photo credit: Tommy Lavergne of Rice University, Houston, Texas
Viewed: 734 times
01/14/09
Three enigmatic Archaea plucked from a pink scum, or biofilm, in California's Richmond Mine. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) images like these show that most have protrusions (B), dark areas that probably are packed ribosomes (C) and unidentified dark inclusions (D). The 100 nanometer scale bar is approximately one-thousandth the width of a human hair. Credit: Brett Barker/UC Berkeley
Viewed: 1056 times
01/14/09
Sampling pink biofilms growing in acid mine drainage deep underground in the Richmond Mine, Iron Mountain, Calif. The water is almost as acidic as battery acid, with a pH of about 1. Credit: Paul Wilmes
Viewed: 796 times
01/14/09
The findings show how cholera cells are able to obtain energy to power essential cell components, like the flagella that keep them motile. Credit: Virginia Tech
Viewed: 693 times
01/14/09
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01/14/09

Viewed: 618 times
01/14/09
A NASA researcher captured this 2005 photo of the Antarctic ice sheet in West Antarctica. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 616 times
01/14/09
From December 2003 to December 2005, MODIS captured these two images showing a draw down of water in a subglacial lake (left)and the rise of water in the same subglacial lake (right). Color coded ICESat tracks across both images indicate rises and falls in the elevation of the lake's water. Credit: NASA
Viewed: 920 times
01/14/09
The fossilized remains of Calothrix, a common bacterium in Yellowstone National Park hot springs, show like branches of a shrub in this microscopic image.
Image credit: Arizona State University, Jack D. Farmer
Viewed: 875 times
01/14/09
Close-up of famous shapes measuring 20 to 200 nanometers across in Allen Hills
meteorite [ALH84001], found at Allen
Hills, Antarctica, showing what has generated controversy around ancient fossilized microbial life.
Image Credit: NASA
Viewed: 893 times
01/14/09

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