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Retrospections Defying Gravity, Part 11
 
Defying Gravity, Part 11
gURLs in space
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Moon to Mars
Posted:   12/02/13

Summary: The final entry on our list of spacewalking women is astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson. Along with performing EVAs in orbit, Dyson was also the first astronaut to be born after the Apollo missions.

The gURLs who Spacewalk

Spacewalking astronauts are big right now thanks to a certain blockbuster movie full of A-List Hollywood Stars. In preparing for her role in Gravity, actress Sandra Bullock turned to real-life astronaut Cady Coleman for advice about what life in space is really like. But the big screen is obviously nothing like the real thing.

Stepping outside of a spacecraft that is orbiting our planet at speeds of thousands (and thousands) of miles per hour is a frightening prospect. So who are the brave women that have actually performed this heroic work in real life?

To this day, eleven women have made the journey. The final entry in our list is astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson.

NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 24 flight engineer, attired in her Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, is pictured in the Quest airlock of the International Space Station as the final of three planned spacewalks to remove and replace an ammonia pump module that failed July 31 draws to a close. Credit: NASA
NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 23 flight engineer, works with experiment hardware in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA
Tracy Caldwell Dyson

Tracy Dyson flew as a Mission Specialist on Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-118) and was a member of the crew on the ISS. While on Expedition 24, she spent 22 hours outside of the station on three separate EVAs. Among her tasks was the replacement of a malfunctioning coolant pump on the station. Interestingly, she was also the first astronaut to be born after Apollo.

 


One of the greatest lessons I’ve learned on my journey of becoming and serving as an astronaut for NASA is to not give away my self-confidence. I believe it’s a lesson I’m still learning.” – Tracey Caldwell Dyson, from Women@NASA.

 


Astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson uses American Sign Language to answer student questions from the International Space Station. From NASAgovVideo

 

Attired in her Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit, NASA astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson, Expedition 24 flight engineer, prepares to exit the Quest airlock of the International Space Station to begin the first of three planned spacewalks to remove and replace an ammonia pump module that failed July 31. Credit: NASA


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Defying Gravity, Part 1
Defying Gravity, Part 2
Defying Gravity, Part 3
Defying Gravity, Part 4
Defying Gravity, Part 5
Defying Gravity, Part 6
Defying Gravity, Part 7
Defying Gravity, Part 8
Defying Gravity, Part 9
Defying Gravity, Part 10
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