Interview

  • To Pluto and Beyond
    As the New Horizons mission to Pluto prepared for launch in January, NASA presented a webcast in which mission scientists answered questions from the public. In this edited transcript, project scientist Harold Weaver Jr. talks about what we could learn about Pluto.
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  • Questioning Pluto
    As the New Horizons mission to Pluto prepared for launch in January, NASA presented a webcast in which scientists answered questions from public. In this edited transcript, David Kusnierkiewicz, mission systems engineer for New Horizons, talks about technology that will take spacecraft
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  • The Lessons of Exposure
    In this interview with Gerda Horneck, she shares her concerns about sending humans to Mars. She also explains why our own bacteria, after being exposed to the harsh radiation of outer space, won´t come back to haunt us.
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  • Swarming for Success
    Dr. Penelope Boston and Dr. Steven Dubowsky are working to develop "hopping microbots" capable of exploring hazardous terrain, including underground caves. If the project pans out, hopping microbots may some day be sent to search for life below the surface of Mars. In Part
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  • Exploring Caves with Hopping Microbots
    For the past several years, NASA has been encouraging scientists and engineers to think outside the box, to come up with ideas just this side of science fiction. One of the projects that received funding earlier this year was a collaboration between Dr. Penelope Boston
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  • Latching onto Lichen
    Lichen, those colored crusts that sprout on bare rocks, dead wood, frozen soil, and other inhospitable sites, can tolerate the extreme conditions of outer space. In this interview with Astrobiology Magazine, Rosa de la Torre talks about the potential for lichen to travel
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  • Expectations for a Final Theory?
    Martin Rees is Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and Britain´s Astronomer Royal. He is the author of numerous popular science books, including the bestselling Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces That Shape the Universe.
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  • Weighing the Benefits of the I-suit
    Considering that space suits can weigh upwards of 200 pounds, you'd think that the lighter the suit, the easier it would be to work in. Not necessarily so, says geologist Dean Eppler. In this interview he explains why other factors can be more important than
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  • Making a List, Checking It Twice
    When you're on the moon, trying to fix some broken equipment, you don't want to waste time fumbling around in oversized gloves trying to read the instruction manual. NASA's solution: make the operations checklist electronic, and mount a display inside an astronaut's helmet. Geologist Dean
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  • Learning to Work in the Suit
    What's it like to walk around on Mars in a space suit? No-one knows for sure. But geologist Dean Eppler has come as close as anyone. In this interview, he talks about his experience working in the Mark III experimental suit, as part of this
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