Mars

  • NASA's Mars rover Curiosity has switched to a redundant onboard computer in response to a memory issue on the computer that had been active.
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  • Dawn Sumner helps interpret the visual data that Curiosity rover sees with its cameras. In this interview, she reveals why Curiosity’s first images of Mount Sharp made her cry.
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  • NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has successfully obtained the first sample ever collected from the interior of a rock on another planet. The rock selected for the first sample drilling may hold evidence of wet environmental conditions long ago.
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  • Curious about Life: Interview with Jeff Moersch
    In this interview, Jeff Moersch describes the DAN instrument on the Mars Curiosity rover. Donated by the Russian Federal Space Agency, this instrument will search for underground water without any need for digging.
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  • Scientists have explained what looks like a piece of shiny metal sticking out of a rock on Mars in a photograph from the Curiosity rover.
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  • Curiosity has used its drill to bore into a flat rock on Mars and collect a sample from its interior. The rock could hold evidence about long-gone wet environments, providing astrobiologists with new insight into the potential for past life on the red plant.
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  • Scientists have discovered how Antarctica's Don Juan Pond gets the salty water it needs to exist. Their findings could help reveal the possibilities for flowing water on Mars, both in the past and the present.
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  • Ridges in impact craters on Mars appear to be fossils of cracks in the Martian surface, formed by minerals deposited by flowing water. Water flowing beneath the surface suggests life may once have been possible on Mars.
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  • Richard Leveille of the Canadian Space Agency is one of the scientists working on Curiosity's Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument. ChemCam’s laser will target selected rocks, creating an ionized, glowing plasma that will be used to analyze their composition.
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  • NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted seasonal changes on sand dunes in the far north of Mars. The changes are caused by warming of a winter blanket of frozen carbon dioxide.
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