Meteorites,Comets and Asteroids

  • For the first time, astronomers have observed a tumbling comet nucleus with a changing rotational rate. The study combined with results from NASA's EPOXI mission are providing new insight about these objects that may have played a role in life's origin on Earth, and could
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  • A rare number of Hot Jupiter planets orbit their stars in a direction opposite to the star's rotation. This violates basic ideas of planet and star formation. Now, new research may explain how these planets flipped their orbits.
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  • Comet Elenin is making a trip through the inner-solar system this fall. Its voyage will give scientists a chance to study how the comet is effected as it passes near the Sun.
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  • Comet Elenin is making a trip through the inner-solar system this fall. Its voyage will give scientists a chance to study how the comet is effected as it passes near the Sun.
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  • On November 8, 2011, the asteroid 2005 YU55 will be making a relatively close flyby of Earth. There is no threat of a collision between the asteroid and our planet, but its approach will provide scientists with a close-up view of a 400-meter-wide space rock.
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  • On November 8, 2011, the asteroid 2005 YU55 will be making a relatively close flyby of Earth. There is no threat of a collision between the asteroid and our planet, but its approach will provide scientists with a close-up view of a 400-meter-wide space rock.
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  • New observations of '55 Cancri e' indicate that the planet is 60 percent larger in diameter than Earth, but eight times more massive. The data also indicates that 55 Cancri e orbits so close to its star that it is baked to a temperature of
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  • NASA satellites have shown that an increase in the brightness of the asteroid Scheila is likely due to a collision between Scheila and a smaller asteroid. Studying the physical properties and behavior of asteroids can help us understand their potential role in the origins of
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  • A new study shows that emissions from the radio aurora of Jupiter-like planets should be detectable with radio telescopes. The finding means that detecting exoplanets that orbit at large distances from their star could now be easier to find.
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  • Astronomers have found that Jupiter-like worlds around other stars push shock waves ahead of them. Like Earth's magnetic 'bow-shock', these planetary 'shocks' can protect the atmospheres of giant planets from their star's damaging emissions.
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