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  • Rover Science Team Eyes Sleepy Hollow
    After passing a complete check-up on Sol 2, the Spirit rover is getting ready to communicate directly with Earth using its high-gain antenna.
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  • Postcards from Mars
    In its first transfer of Mars imagery, the rover Spirit beamed down around seventy images, and exceeded its best predicted transfer rates by 150%. The landing area looks surprising clean and not too rugged, which will help geologists uncover whether it is an ancient dry
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  • Stardust’s Success
    The Stardust spacecraft successfully flew by the comet Wild 2 on Friday, gathering dust and taking pictures. The first image surprised scientists - the comet's nucleus is a round snowball pocketed with deep caverns, with at least five jets spewing material out into space.
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  • Spirit’s First Light
    First images show spectacular camera views from nearly a quarter billion miles away, on the surface of Mars.
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  • Catching Comet Dust
    The Stardust spacecraft prepares to fly into the stormy coma of the comet Wild 2 on Friday, ending a five-year wait. The spacecraft will "kiss the comet's dust," collecting enough of the tiny grains to bring back to Earth for analysis.
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  • Interplanetary Internet
    Dr. Vinton Cerf was one of the early researchers who worked on the embryonic web when it was called ARPANET; he is often referred to as one of the 'fathers of the internet'. He also has outlined the requirements for a future interplanetary
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  • ESA’s Beagle: Sniffing Out Life on Mars
    The European Space Agency's Beagle 2, scheduled to land on Mars on Christmas day, will be the first spacecraft in nearly 30 years to search directly for evidence of martian life. At the heart of the mission lies the lander's Gas Analysis Package.
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  • Christmas Vigil Ensues
    In 1968, when Apollo 8 became the first manned mission to orbit the moon, the crew's dramatic Christmas Eve recitation from the Book of Genesis was broadcast back to all those on the 'good Earth'.
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  • First Images Show Organic Molecules
    There are more organic molecules in the universe than what can be discerned in visible light. Using their new orbital infrared telescope, astrophysicists are finding that the basic building blocks of carbon chemistry have found a primary place in some of the most unlikely spots.
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  • Living on Mars Time
    During the upcoming Mars Exploration Rover missions, participating scientists and engineers will be waking and going to bed with the rising and setting of the sun - on Mars. There's a hitch: A day on Mars is 39.5 minutes longer than a day on
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  • Martian Dangers: Staring at the Sun
    Radiation may seem like a necessary energy input to sustain any biological ecosystem: warmth, light, photosynthesis depend on our sun. But is radiation an invisible enemy to finding life elsewhere, where a protective blanket does not shroud thinner atmospheres than our own?
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  • Seeing Red: Getting the Front Seats
    The Mars Express took its closest view yet of the red planet, from a distance of several million miles. The best seats for the forthcoming landing views are just beginning to fill up for the start of the show.
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  • Cracking the Stellar Primer
    If an artificial signal ever were detected from another world, it would almost certainly be encoded or encrypted. Judging by isolated civilizations that contact each other's languages across time and space--such as the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic writers and modern linguists.
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  • Europa: Frozen Ocean in Motion
    Few places in our solar system can offer more intriguing conditions for primitive life than Jupiter's moon Europa. Covered by a vast ice-sheet, Europa cloaks its subterranean ocean but evidence of a briny, electrically-conductive sea may provide at least two of the conditions needed
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  • Arecibo Chronicle
    Getting the big picture in the search for life elsewhere is a challenging balance between technology and philosophy. The SETI Institute's Seth Shostak reports from the world's largest radio telescope, Arecibo, about new signal processing methods.
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