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  • The Cambrian Explosion: Tooth and Claw
    Scientists ponder the causes of the Cambrian explosion.
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  • The Driest Place on Earth
    How much water does life need to survive? Chile's Atacama desert hold some interesting clues - clues that may help researchers in the hunt for life on Mars.
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  • A Pothole in the Road of Life
    Desert potholes may provide clues to the evolution of life on Earth.
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  • Unfamiliar Life
    Why should the particular polymer combinations of Earth reign supreme?
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  • Planetary Embryos Hatch in the Southern Constellation Centaurus
    Distant planetisimals may have similar sun-distances and temperatures to Earth.
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  • The First Sulfur Eaters
    Sulfate-reducing bacteria have been known to exist at least 2.72 billion years ago, but new findings from Western Australian rocks push the date of their existence back an additional 750 million years. This would mean that sulfate-reducing bacteria are one of the oldest known life
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  • Signs of Life in Acid-Washed Rocks
    Clues to early terrestrial life may be entombed in ancient sedimentary rocks, if only acid vapor can unveil their fossil shapes.
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  • The Search for Distant Earths
    Imagine trying to see an ant crawling across the headlight of a car miles away. That is the magnitude of the task facing astronomers as they search for small, rocky Earth-like planets around other stars - planets that might harbor life
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  • Tandem Evolution
    A type of clam that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vents is so closely knit with a bacterium living in its tissues that their evolutionary paths, as recorded in their DNA, run in lockstep.
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  • The Three Domains of Life
    When scientists first started to classify life, everything was designated as either an animal or a plant. But as new forms of life were discovered, the original classification was not sufficient enough to organize the diversity and complexity of life.
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  • Life without Volcanic Heat
    An 18-story undersea vent off the Atlantic, near what has been called the 'Lost City', has recently revealed itself as ripe with exotic microbial life.
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  • Europa: Chewy or Crunchy?
    For geophysicist William B. Moore, the question of whether life exists on Jupiter's moon Europa boils down to whether the moon's center is chewy or crunchy.
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  • Earth from Afar: A Tiny Flickering Dot
    With over 70 planets identified around distant stars, astronomers are now looking for ways to classify which ones are most like Earth -- that is to say, the ones most likely with biological potential.
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  • Why Microbes Matter
    Research on Mars can lead to advances in biotechnology and medicine, bring us closer to understanding our origins.
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  • How Jupiter Got Big
    How did the largest planet in our solar system form? New theories on how planets like Jupiter form put traditional theories to the test.
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