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  • Seeing Mars through a Test Tube
    By recreating the Martian surface in the laboratory, NASA scientists may have begun to answer two questions: why the Martian surface is so red, and why organic life has not yet been found there.
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  • Jovian Moons
    Jupiter's four largest moons were discovered by Galileo in 1610. Three of them might hold oceans of liquid water beneath their icy exteriors. Liquid water is a prerequisite for life.
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  • The Greening of the Red Planet
    A hardy microbe from Earth may one day transform the barren ground of Mars into arable soil.
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  • Thawing Mars
    Greenhouse gases might one day be used to warm the cold surface of Mars, and make the planet habitable for humans.
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  • Titanic Moon: Orange Soup from Saturnian Turn
    NASA Astrobiology Institute and Penn State have developed a method to understand Titan's atmospheric chemistry.
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  • The Case of the Missing Water
    Did an ancient flood cover the northern lowlands? Mars Orbiter images give a front row seat.
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  • Back to the Surface: NASA’s 2003 Mission to Mars
    Two Mars rovers, one in May and the other in June of 2003 will land six months later at different locations. Both take on the daunting task of probing for water clues.
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  • Mars Lakes
    A 'young' Martian lake would be at least half-billion years old, but Martian deltas might not seem as remote as the present day desert.
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  • Life Under Bombardment
    Does Greenland give a clue as to whether life was seeded twice: 'stock' cultures surviving one big impact event? Life Under Bombardment looks for the evidence of our terrestrial past.
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