spacer
 
Advanced Search
Astrobiology Magazine Facebook  Astrobiology Magazine Twitter
  
Hot Topic Solar System Mars Mars Crater Shows Climate Evolution
 
Mars Crater Shows Climate Evolution
Source: ESA press release
print PDF
Mars
Posted:   06/09/12

Summary: Images of a remarkable crater on Mars show that the planet's climate fluctuated due to changes in its rotation axis.


High-Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) nadir and colour channel data taken on 19 June 2011 by ESA’s Mars Express have been combined to form a natural-colour view of the Danielson and Kalocsa craters and their environment in the Arabia Terra region. Centred at around 7°N and 353°E, this image has a ground resolution of about 26 m per pixel. The image shows the yardangs bisected by the darker dune field in Danielson crater. Credits: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)
ESA’s Mars Express has provided images of a remarkable crater on Mars that may show evidence that the planet underwent significant periodic fluctuations in its climate due to changes in its rotation axis. Understanding the historic changes in Mars' climate can help astrobiologists determine if the planet was once habitable for life as we know it.

On 19 June 2011, Mars Express pointed its high-resolution stereo camera at the Arabia Terra region of Mars, imaging the Danielson and Kalocsa craters.

Danielson crater is named after the late George E. Danielson, who was instrumental in the development of many spacecraft cameras flown to Mars. Seen to the right (north) in the image, it is the larger crater, roughly 60 km across.

Kalocsa crater lies in the center of the image and is smaller, about 33 km in diameter and a kilometer shallower than Danielson. It is named after a town in Hungary famed for its astronomical observatory.

Danielson crater, like many in the Arabia Terra region, is filled with layered sediments, which in this instance have been heavily eroded over time. Within the crater are peculiarly layered buttes, known as yardangs.

Yardangs are streamlined hills carved from bedrock or any consolidated or semi-consolidated material by abrasive dust and sand particles carried in the wind.

Danielson and Kalocsa craters are seen here in broader context. The smaller rectangle shows the region covered in this ESA Mars Express HRSC image release, which covers part of Arabia Terra. Credits: NASA MGS MOLA Science Team
They are seen on Earth in desert regions, with notable examples in North Africa, Central Asia and Arizona in the United States.

In the case of Danielson crater, it is believed that sediments were cemented by water, possibly from an ancient deep groundwater reservoir, before being eroded by the wind.

The orientation of the yardangs leads scientists to theorize that strong north-northeasterly winds (from the lower right in the image) both deposited the original sediments and then caused their subsequent erosion in a later drier period of Martian history.

A 30 km-long field of darker dunes can be seen bisecting the yardangs and is thought to have formed at a later epoch.

The crater floor of Danielson shows evidence for a series of alternating sedimentary layers with roughly uniform thickness and separation.

Some scientists believe that this indicates periodic fluctuations in the climate of Mars, triggered by regular changes in the planet’s axis of rotation. The different layers would have been laid down during different epochs.

By marked contrast, Kalocsa crater shows a completely different topography.

Here, no layered sediments are seen. This is thought to be due to the higher altitude of its floor, with the crater not tapping in to the suspected underlying ancient water reservoir.

Another hypothesis is that this crater is younger than its neighbor, created when water was not present anymore.


Related Stories

Astrobiology Roadmap Goal 2: Life in our solar system

Did Ancient Mars Have a Runaway Greenhouse?
Mars Methane Lessons in a Meteorite
Paydirt at Mars Rover Site
About Us
Contact Us
Links
Sitemap
Podcast Rss Feed
Daily News Story RSS Feed
Latest News Story RSS Feed
Learn more about RSS
Chief Editor & Executive Producer: Helen Matsos
Copyright © 2014, Astrobio.net