spacer
 
Advanced Search
Astrobiology Magazine Facebook  Astrobiology Magazine Twitter
  
Hot Topic Solar System Mars Martian South Pole Not Just Dry Ice
 
Martian South Pole Not Just Dry Ice
based on ESA Mars Express report
print PDF
Mars
Posted:   03/20/04

Summary: The north polar cap on Mars has been considered a source of frozen water and carbon dioxide, but the southern cap was thought water-free. According to remoting sensing from the European Mars Express orbiter, the South Pole has tens of miles of frozen water-ice.


mars_pole
Map of the Mars south pole, as derived from OMEGA infrared spectral images, showing the bright polar cap, rich in carbon dioxide (light pink), surrounded by water-rich ice, free of carbon dioxide (green to blue).
Image Credit: ESA/Mars Express
Mars has vast fields of perennial water ice, stretching out from the south pole of the Red Planet, according to recently released Mars Express images.

Astronomers have known for years that Mars possessed polar ice caps, but early attempts at chemical analysis suggested only that the northern cap could be composed of water ice, and the southern cap was thought to be carbon dioxide ice.

Recent space missions then suggested that the southern ice cap, existing all year round, could be a mixture of water and carbon dioxide. But only with Mars Express have scientists been able to confirm directly for the first time that water ice is present at the south pole too.

Mars Express made observations with its OMEGA instrument to measure the amounts of sunlight and heat reflected from the Martian polar region. When planetary scientists analysed the data, it clearly showed that, as well as carbon dioxide ice, water ice was present too.

MARSIS
MARSIS's long antenna will fly over Mars, bouncing radio waves over a selected area and then receiving and analyzing the "echoes." Any near-surface liquid water should send a strong signal.
Credit: NASA/JPL
The results showed that hundreds of square kilometres of permafrost' surround the south pole. Permafrost is water ice, mixed into the soil of Mars, and frozen to the hardness of solid rock by the low Martian temperatures. This is the reason why water ice has been hidden from detection until now - because the soil with which it is mixed cannot reflect light easily and so it appears dark.

However, OMEGA looked at the surface with infrared eyes and, being sensitive to heat, clearly picked up the signature of water ice. The discovery hints that perhaps there are much larger quantities of water ice all over Mars than previously thought.

Extreme Explorers' Hall of Fame
The wide angle view of the martian north polar cap was acquired on March 13, 1999, during early northern summer. The light-toned surfaces are residual water ice that remains through the summer season. The nearly circular band of dark material surrounding the cap consists mainly of sand dunes formed and shaped by wind. The north polar cap is roughly 1100 kilometers (680 miles) across.Credit: NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems
Using this data, planetary scientists now know that the south polar region of Mars can be split into three separate parts. Part one is the bright polar cap itself, a mixture of 85% highly reflective carbon dioxide ice and 15% water ice.

The second part comprises steep slopes known as scarps', made almost entirely of water ice, that fall away from the polar cap to the surrounding plains. The third part was unexpected and encompasses the vast permafrost fields that stretch for tens of kilometres away from the scarps.

The OMEGA observations were made between 18 January and 11 February this year, when it was late summer for the Martian southern hemisphere and temperatures would be at their highest. Even so, that is probably only -130 degrees Celsius and the ice that Mars Express has observed is a permanent feature of this location.

During the winter months, scientists expect that carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will freeze onto the poles, making them much larger and covering some of the water ice from view.

Mars Express and OMEGA will now continue looking for water ice and minerals across the surface of the planet. In May, another Mars Express instrument, the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS), will begin collecting data, looking for water underground. MARSIS is a radar device on the Mars Express satellite that can look through the top five kilometers of martian crust to search for layers of water and ice.

The Italian space agency is planning to fly a shallow subsurface radar, called SHARAD, on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to see if water ice is present at depths greater than one meter. While MARSIS has a higher penetration capability, it has much lower resolution than SHARAD will have.

"Odyssey, MER, and Mars Express will determine how much water exists at present, hopefully, and provide better constraints on past water abundance," says Jonathan Lunine of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona,. "I am particularly interested in the MARSIS radar results, and those of its successor - SHARAD."


Related Stories

Spirit's Sol images and slideshow
Opportunity image gallery and slideshow
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter
Mars Express
Odyssey
MARSIS
Born Bone Dry

About Us
Contact Us
Links
Sitemap
Podcast Rss Feed
Daily News Story RSS Feed
Latest News Story RSS Feed
Learn more about RSS
Chief Editor & Executive Producer: Helen Matsos
Copyright © 2014, Astrobio.net