Deep Space

  • Interview with Brother Guy Consolmagno
    At the 2004 Astrobiology Science Conference, Vatican astronomer Dr. Guy Consolmagno discussed his research as curator of one of the world's largest meteorite collections.
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  • Two New Very Hot Jupiters
    The transit method of new planet discovery relies on observing distant eclipses. Faint starlight decreases once during each orbit as the inferred planet passes between Earth and the star. The second and third new planets discovered using this technique are reported to be large,
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  • News_Image_244
    Extraído do livro "Faint Echoes, Distant Stars: The Science and Politics of Finding Life Beyond Earth." (“Ecos Fracos, Estrelas Distantes: A Ciência e a Política de Encontrar vida Além da Terra” sem versão em português).
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  • Ancient Astronauts
    Ben Bova writes in his new book, "Faint Echoes, Distant Stars" about the science and politics of finding life beyond Earth.
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  • How Advanced Could They Be?
    Renowed physicist, Dr. Michio Kaku, considers the physics of extra-terrestrial civilizations, and whether we can classify their evolution judging from our own work in progress.
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  • Three Tough Questions
    When does asking the right questions tell more than necessarily knowing the right answers? Perhaps when crossing the fertile boundary between biology and astronomy.
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  • Nearby Planet Nursery
    In an exclusive interview with Berkeley astronomer, Paul Kalas, he describes how their planet-finding team uncovered a nearby nursery that may include the closest star with an embryonic solar system in the making.
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  • Best Job in the World: Jill Tarter
    The editors of TIME magazine have named astrobiologist and SETI researcher--Dr. Jill Tarter-- as one of the world's 100 most "influential and powerful people." The award is based on her lifelong study of search strategies for life elsewhere in the universe.
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  • New Planet, Magnified
    The gravity of a star can act as a lens, focusing and intensifying the light of a star behind it. The combined light from the two stars causes that point in the night sky to suddenly appear much brighter. For the first time, a
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  • Dating A Star
    Sifting through the fossil records of nearly 100,000 galaxies may seem more like paleontology than astronomy. Some early conclusions from such a stellar expedition have revealed a five billion year peak in star formation and more massive galaxies forming stars earliest.
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  • Can SETI Probe for Probes?
    Just as our own robots reach out beyond the solar system, searching for life elsewhere may well involve hailing some kind of space artifact in our own neighborhood. At least one style of life search is about looking for the technological evidence of life, rather
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  • Ashes of the Phoenix
    What had become the first systematic attempt to search for another world's intelligent radio communications has wound down. Project Phoenix will transition to more advanced search methods, but its pioneering status has become part of history.
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  • How Many Earths?
    About half of hundred solar systems with known planets may hold potential Earths. Simulating whether such stars and outer planets might eject an Earth-like world, the results also suggest another possibility, a habitable moon around a much larger Jupiter-like world.
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  • Can Intelligent Life Thrive in Close Quarters?
    Where should SETI researchers target their hunt for other intelligent species? The answer depends in large part on whether planets orbiting dim red-dwarf, or M-class, stars can provide suitable habitats for the evolution of intelligent life.
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  • Looking towards Creation
    To astronomers looking back to what is called a Redshift 12 distance implies seeing light from the first half billion years of the universe. The resulting view can be compared to time-travel, since it gives a glimpse of galaxies as they once appeared soon after
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