Deep Space

  • Our Lonely Galaxy: Part II
    The NASA exobiology branch sponsored a public forum in Palo Alto, CA, on Tuesday, August 26, 2003, entitled, "The Drake Equation Revisited." The forum addressed the questions of estimating the probabilities for finding intelligent life in the universe. This is the second in the series
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  • News_Image_322
    O ramo de exobiologia da NASA patrocinou um fórum público em Palo Alto, Califórnia, EUA, na terça, 26 de agosto de 2003, intitulado “The Drake Equation Revisited” (“A Equação de Drake Revisitada”). O fórum apresentou as questões sobre a estimativa das probabilidades de se encontrar
    more...
  • The Drake Equation Revisited: Part I
    The NASA exobiology branch sponsored a public forum in Palo Alto, CA, on Tuesday, August 26, 2003, entitled, "The Drake Equation Revisited." The forum addressed the questions of estimating the probabilities for finding intelligent life in the universe. Here is the first in the series
    more...
  • News_Image_275
     O ramo de exobiologia da NASA patrocinou um fórum público em Palo Alto, Califórnia, EUA, na terça, 26 de agosto de 2003, intitulado “The Drake Equation Revisited” (“A Equação de Drake Revisitada”). O fórum apresentou as questões sobre a estimativa das probabilidades de se encontrar
    more...
  • Discovering New Worlds
    Few modern scientific adventures can rival what is currently the task of those discovering new planets. While most of the hundred or so new worlds found so far have been found using the planet's inferred influence on its parent star's gravitational wobble, a few have
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  • Brown Dwarf Detectives
    Studying the chemical fingerprints, or spectra, from fifty brown dwarf stars has revealed not only features of why such failed stars (about the size of Jupiter) are hard to find, but also some guesses as to why they may outnumber the visible stars in our
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  • Infrared Telescope Powers Up
    The Infrared Space Telescope has snapped it first image and transmitted the 'aliveness' test back to Earth. This sun-circling observatory will help astronomers probe the primordial universe, since most of the remnants of that epoch are now more available in infrared.
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  • Alpha and Omega: Part II
    How did the universe begin and how will it end? And perhaps, more importantly, how can we know? Science magazine writer, Charles Seife, has taken up this compelling question in his new book, Alpha and Omega. He discusses the findings of cosmologists in Part II
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  • Terrestrial Tip of the Cap
    What makes a planet habitable has much to do with its compatibility with liquid water. Other than this range that might define a temperate climate, a second precondition for life is likely some change of seasons. Seasonal melting and freezing of water, in turn,
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  • Earth’s Radio-Wave Halo
    The Allen Telescope Array, planned for completion in the next few years, promises a robust and novel use of off-the-shelf radio dishes. Deployed in northern California, this dish array is one intriguing technology that Dr. Jilll Tarter describes.
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  • Infrared Telescope Lifts Off
    The fourth and final telescope from NASA's Great Observatory series successfully launched early Monday morning. The telescope will probe the universe with its infrared sensitive optics. The launch on a Delta Heavy Lift vehicle will place it in a solar orbit.
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  • Alpha and Omega: Part I
    How did the universe begin and how will it end? And perhaps, more importantly, how can we know? Science magazine writer, Charles Seife, has taken up this compelling question in his new book, Alpha and Omega. He discusses the findings of cosmologists in this two-part
    more...
  • The Mystery of Standard Candles
    Few casual observers may appreciate the importance of a seemingly obscure type of stellar explosion, called a Type Ia supernova. Without these calibrations on astronomical distances, it would be much more difficult to gauge depth in the otherwise flat starfield of a telescope.
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  • Star Winks Back
    A star that has begun eclipsing every 48 days shows the remarkable time scales of stellar evolution. The eclipsing star may be 'winking', according to Harvard-Smithsonian astronomers, because of a protoplanetary disk that beckons a solar system coming of age.
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  • Star Bright: Part II
    In Part I of this article, the differences between typical stars, brown dwarfs and sub-brown dwarfs were discussed. Stars have a mass of 75 Jupiters or greater, brown dwarfs have a mass between 13 and 75 Jupiters, and sub-brown dwarfs are less than 13 Jupiter
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