Moon to Mars

  • What Would a Martian Drive? (Q & A Part I)
    Three leading space scientists discuss how best to search for life, given what we know today about Mars, history's lessons about human exploration and whether Mars is another place to plant a flag.
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  • David Morrison: Waystations to Mars
    Do asteroids make good candidates for testing mission profiles before trying to get humans on Mars? Dr. David Morrison considers the role of robots and humans, along with which targets might round out a priority list between the Moon and Mars.
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  • Michael Carr: Bringing Mars Home
    How important would it be to have a martian sample to pass around to the worlds' best laboratories, much the way that researchers share meteors and moon rocks today? According to Dr. Michael Carr, the stepwise goal of returning an interesting rock from Mars will
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  • Jonathan Lunine: Life Finder
    Way beyond the horizon of currently planned missions is a place for what Dr. Jonathan Lunine describes as a 'life finder'. The question he poses in his testimony to the Presidential Commission on 'Moon To Mars and Beyond' centers on how one looks for another
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  • Thomas Stafford: Penmanship in Boxing Gloves
    General Thomas Stafford presents his unique views on what it takes for humans to get to the moon and Mars. As a former astronaut, Stafford shows a characteristic attention to the fine details while never failing also to understand a bigger picture.
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  • What’s Next?
    In this multipart lecture series, noted author Dr. Andrew Chaikin takes his unique historical perspective on the question of 'Can Humans Get to Mars?' In this final encore installment, what we have learned about the moon from robotic and remote sensing is laid out
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  • Mars: Man or Machine?
    In this multipart lecture series, noted author Dr. Andrew Chaikin takes his unique historical perspective on the question of 'Can Humans Get to Mars?' This third installment considers what kinds of landscape the first human on Mars might encounter.
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  • Going Mobile
    In this multipart lecture series, noted author Dr. Andrew Chaikin takes his unique historical perspective on the question of 'Can Humans Get to Mars?' This second installment addresses how one might want to remain mobile on another planet.
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  • Hemorrhaging from the Fingertips
    In this multipart lecture series, noted author Dr. Andrew Chaikin takes his unique historical perspective on the question of 'Can Humans Get to Mars?' This first installment introduces the twin problems of heavy-lift and human survival.
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  • Moon Meteor Truly Extraterrestrial
    When the Apollo moon rocks were analyzed back on Earth, there was a difference in their composition compared to what was predicted by remote sensing. A theory about space weathering was proposed thirty years ago to account for the observed differences.
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  • Red Planet in Sensaround
    An experience that few can imagine sampling is in some ways the simplest: to breathe deeply on another planet or moon. So what does Mars offer today to the sensory connoisseur?
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  • Roam in a Day
    Four prominent scientists are represented on the new Presidential commission chartered to study how best to plan a moon to Mars initiative. The commissioners repeated a need for crafting sustained efforts, while also considering an off-charter topic of how to sustain interest in space astronomy.
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  • Best Laid Plans, Men and Machines
    John Logsdon recently served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board for NASA, and continues to shape views of both space history and tomorrow's policy. Astrobiology Magazine had the opportunity to talk with Dr. Logsdon about exploration initiatives.
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  • George W. Bush: Triad of Exploration Goals
    The Presidential NASA address outlined broad plans for three exploration goals: finish the space station, a new shuttle by 2014, and a return to the moon.
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  • Lunar Dust Bowl
    Radar data taken with the world's largest radio telescope at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, shows that the lunar poles likely lack ice in shadowed craters, a finding that contradicts the earlier results from the Defense Department's Clementine satellite.
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