Exploration

  • Best Laid Plans, Men and Machines
    John Logsdon recently served on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board for NASA, and continues to shape views of both space history and tomorrow's policy. Astrobiology Magazine had the opportunity to talk with Dr. Logsdon about exploration initiatives.
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  • George W. Bush: Triad of Exploration Goals
    The Presidential NASA address outlined broad plans for three exploration goals: finish the space station, a new shuttle by 2014, and a return to the moon.
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  • Solar System Exploration Survey
    Solar system exploration remains a compelling activity because it may provide answers to basic questions of profound interest: Are we alone? Where did we come from? What is our destiny? The National Research Council has surveyed expert opinion on how to go about asking these
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  • Year In Review
    Planetary scientists may remember the years 2003-2004 as a remarkably productive span for discoveries, whether hunting for new planets or landing on the ones that in our solar system seem to be most compatible with early Earth-like histories.
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  • Dinner with Captain Kirk
    Director, writer, and one of the most memorable fictional explorers of space--William Shatner's Captain Kirk--explains how to go where few have gone before: how extreme explorers might confront the limits of life both terrestrial or beyond.
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  • Interplanetary Internet
    Dr. Vinton Cerf was one of the early researchers who worked on the embryonic web when it was called ARPANET; he is often referred to as one of the 'fathers of the internet'. He also has outlined the requirements for a future interplanetary
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  • Hooked by Flying: The Wrights
    On the much celebrated centennial of powered flight, consider the contributions of those two brothers who went rapidly from bicyclists to flyers.
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  • Winter Boon From Deep Space
    When a picture of another planet or close-up view of a comet gets broadcast to the internet, most likely it first journeyed from a spacecraft camera to one of three large dishes that make up what is called the Deep Space Network.
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  • Lunar Dust Bowl
    Radar data taken with the world's largest radio telescope at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, shows that the lunar poles likely lack ice in shadowed craters, a finding that contradicts the earlier results from the Defense Department's Clementine satellite.
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  • Calibrating the Moon
    If amateur astronomers can just drag their telescopes to a dark, clear spot and set-up a night's observation, the calibration of the world's largest radio telescope is not quite so straightforward.
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  • Voyager: Beyond the Great Beyond
    Has humanity's furthest operating space probe, Voyager, reached the edge of our solar system? Three research teams are debating whether Earthlings have sent operating technology beyond the reach of our local solar neighborhood, or not.
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  • Red Moon Rising
    Tonight's lunar eclipse presents a blood-red hue of scattered light from the Earth against the grey pallette of our Moon's reflective crust.
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  • Location, Location, Puerto Rico is Listening
    Twice a year, every spring and autumn, a SETI team travels to the coast of Puerto Rico. Their journey is one hundred times faster than the one that Columbus first set out on--500 years ago.
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  • James Cameron II:  Extreme Life
    In the second installment of Astrobiology Magazine's interview with Academy Award winning film-maker, James Cameron, his life as an extreme explorer comes to the forefront.
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  • Compact Disc Puts Lab in a Spin
    Testing in the field for signs of life has not always been convenient, cheap or unambiguous. Combining many off-the-shelf biology tests, a compact disk under NASA evaluation for future missions may simplify the remote functions of a modern laboratory.
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