Extreme Life

    • Living in the Dark
      Over the past several years, scientists have discovered life in the most unusual places. From rocky abodes deep underground, to hot volcanic vents under the seas.
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    • From Lightbulbs to Life
      A one-celled organism that lives in deep-sea volcanic vents has developed an alternative metabolism that uses tungsten - an element popularly used to make lightbulb filaments.
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    • Why Microbes Matter
      Research on Mars can lead to advances in biotechnology and medicine, bring us closer to understanding our origins.
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    • From Lightbulbs to Life
      A one-celled organism that lives in deep-sea volcanic vents has developed an alternative metabolism that uses tungsten - an element popularly used to make lightbulb filaments. meyer.html
      more...
    • Living in the Dark
      Over the past several years, scientists have discovered life in the most unusual places. From rocky abodes deep underground, to hot volcanic vents under the seas.
      more...
    • Bugs From Hell
      Geochemists and microbiologists are delving into the details of extreme biochemistry deep within the Earth, where chemical and metabolic processes go at glacial pace, and life appears to be completely disconnected from the photosynthesis-based biological cycles that dominate surface life.
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    • Life without Volcanic Heat
      An 18-story undersea vent off the Atlantic, near what has been called the 'Lost City', has recently revealed itself as ripe with exotic microbial life.
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    • Test-tube RNA
      Research done by scientists at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research offers insights into evolutionary origins of life.
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    • Café Methane
      In recent years, researchers discovered life also thrives in other, much colder, lightless deep-sea ecosystems besides hydrothermal vents.
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    • Eating Kerogen
      A team of researchers discovered that microorganisms in Kentucky's New Albany Shale are eating kerogen.
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    • Why Microbes Matter
      Research of possible microbial life on Mars can lead to advances in biotechnology and medicine.
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    • The Invasion of the Deep-sea Microbes
      The microscopic life around hydrothermal vents may have an ancient heritage -- genetic comparisons suggest that modern vent microbes are close kin to the earliest forms of life on Earth.
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    • Glass Munchers under the Sea
      A team of researchers recently announced that they have found the deepest-living microbes on the planet that eats into rock at the bottom of the sea floor
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    • The Three Domains of Life
      When scientists first started to classify life, everything was designated as either an animal or a plant. But as new forms of life were discovered, the original classification was not sufficient enough to organize the diversity and complexity of life.
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    • Life Down Under
      Recent work by Christopher Chyba (SETI Institute) and Kevin Hand (Stanford University) suggests that there may be ways to nourish biology in watery environments where the Sun's rays don't penetrate.
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