Climate

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    A new study indicates that the Earth could recover from rising CO2 emissions faster than previously thought. Fifty-six million years ago, during a period of rising temperatures and atmospheric CO2, the Earth increased its ability to pull carbon from the air and sped up the
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    Greenhouse gases have increased more frequently in Earth's history than previously believed. Fluxes involved a significant exchange of carbon between surface reservoirs and the atmosphere. Higher levels of CO2 affect nutrient uptake by planets, which could cause problems as the modern climate continues to heat
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    A new study shows that melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are contributing more to rising sea levels than other sources, such as mountain glaciers and ice caps. Studying these sheets is important, because if they collapse they could dramatically change the level of
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    From extreme precipitation events to catastrophic droughts, the effects of climate change may be heralding in a new era of extreme weather. Scientists are trying to determine what the repercussions for the Earth's biosphere could be.
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    Intense global warming may have occurred more frequently in Earth's past than previously believed. New research shows that release of carbon dioxide from the deep oceans could have triggered these ancient 'hyperthermal' events.
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    The ability of organisms to adapt to our changing climate could cause profound changes to the biosphere. Some microbes might remain dormant in environments until conditions improve. Invasive species could move into new environments, potentially triggering a mass extinction.
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    New research shows that modern climate change could become worse than anything known in written history. Could we be facing megadroughts in the future?
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    Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, is focusing on the local effects of climate change in different places in the world. Changing climate trends are resulting in less snow in California's Sierra Nevada mountains and more heavy rain for the state of Queensland in
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    Scientists are studying an exceptional episode of ancient global warming that occurred around 56 million years ago. During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, global sea surface temperatures increased by about 5°C. Studying this period could help scientists understand how modern climate change could effect life on
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    Scientists have discovered that thousands of people lived on a treacherous chain of islands in the Pacific Ring of Fire as far back as at least 6000 B.C. The study is teaching scientists about the adaptability of humans, and could teach us about how our
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    A new study indicates that temperatures may rise more than projected if society keeps emitting greenhouse gasses. The study is based on data concerning climate change during Earth's deep past.
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    Researchers have reached a milestone depth of 3,331 meters while drilling in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide. Drilling into the ice will allow scientists to investigate 100,000 years of Earth climate history.
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    Scientists study the links between the Earth's climate and biosphere, but new studies show that climate could also be intimately linked to human culture. This relationship between climate and culture may be apparent throughout human history.
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    New studies have shown that scientists have underestimated the effect that two chemical compounds may have on Earth's climate. Carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide can contribute to global warming and climate change, and might bring about a climate on Earth that life has never experienced
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    Earth's climate could take 100,000 years or longer to recover from rising CO2 if we don't mitigate our carbon emissions. Scientists studying one ancient bout of global warming 56 million years ago found that CO2 took about 30,000 to 40,000 years to settle out of
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