Climate

    • Viruses Keep Us Breathing
      New research shows that viruses infecting microorganisms in Earth's oceans might ultimately be responsible for much of the oxygen produced on our planet. The study highlights important links between life and the global climate of Earth.
      more...
    • A Question of Climate
      At its birth, our young planet was a ball of molten hot rock. How long did it take to cool down? The answer could indicate the conditions necessary for life to arise, and provide insight into the evolutionary history of life on Earth.
      more...
    • The Goldilocks Zone
      Studying our solar neighbors, Mars and Venus, can provide climate scientists with valuable insights into the way climate catastrophes affect planets. The knowledge that scientists are gaining from current missions like Mars Express and Venus Express may help us understand the future of life on
      more...
    • Pies in the Sky: A Solution to Global Warming?
      If global warming sizzles out of control, could 16 trillion small disks deflect enough sunlight to cool the planet? Astronomer Roger Angel proposes to find out.
      more...
    • Snowball Melted
      New evidence shows that periods of warmth may have occurred during a time in Earth's history when scientists had thought the entire globe was frozen over. The new findings have implications in our understanding of how life interacted with the changing planetary environment of Earth.
      more...
    • Plumbing in Antarctica
      Scientists have discovered a new sub-glacial water system underneath the ice of Antarctica. The findings are causing scientists to rethink how sub-glacial lakes drain into the Southern Ocean.
      more...
    • Earth, She’s Hot and Cold
      New research concerning the transition of the Earth's climate 300 million years ago from an ice age to an ice-free planet has yielded new insights into the processes of climate change. The new findings will also tell us about how Earth's changing climate throughout history
      more...
    • When the Ocean Breathed Deep
      Researchers have uncovered new data about how changes in the past environment of Earth may have encouraged the evolution of multicellular life.
      more...
    • Cyanobacteria Catch 22
      Two and a half billion years ago, photosynthetic organisms started releasing oxygen into the atmosphere, changing the balance of gases on Earth. But researchers have long been puzzled as to how the organisms could make that oxygen without poisoning themselves. Now, two groups of
      more...
    • Sick Earth?
      What caused the Permian-Triassic extinction, the largest mass extinction in Earth's history? The most likely explanation for the disappearance of up to 90 percent of species 250 million years ago, said David Bottjer of the University of Southern California, is that "the earth got
      more...
    • Earth’s Crazy Climate
      Ancient rocks from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean suggest dramatic climate changes during the dinosaur-dominated Mesozoic Era, a time once thought to have been monotonously hot and humid.
      more...
    • Carbon Balance Killed the Dinos
      New research into a missing link in climatology shows that the Earth was not overcome by a greenhouse period when dinosaurs dominated, but experienced rapid fluctuations in temperature and sea level change that resulted in a balance of the global carbon cycle. The study is
      more...
    • Earth’s Circulatory System
      New scientific findings are strengthening the case that the oceans and climate are linked in an intricate dance, and that rapid climate change may be related to how vigorously ocean currents move heat between low and high latitudes.
      more...
    • Earth Slushie
      A study has turned up strong evidence on the "Slushball Earth" side of a decades-long scientific argument. The study appears in the Sept. 29 Science Express. The lead author is Alison Olcott, a Ph.D. student of earth sciences in the USC College of Letters, Arts
      more...
    • Earth’s Wobble Burps
      Open University researchers have uncovered startling new evidence about an extreme period of a sudden, fatal dose of global warming some 180 million years ago during the time of the dinosaurs. The scientists' findings could provide vital clues about climate change happening today and in
      more...