Climate

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    Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, discusses the recent set of email messages sent by the Director of the University of East Anglia´s Climate Research Unit that were hacked and uploaded to a public Web site. The emails have sparked a great deal of
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    Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, recently spoke with Professor Brigitte Nerlich about aspects of climate change related to human behavior. The future of life on Earth may truly be in the hands of humankind - yet our actions are sometimes hard to predict
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    A new study that reconstructed ocean temperatures from millions of years ago could provide new insight into how the Earth responds to climate change.
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    Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, recently discussed how receding glaciers could have catastrophic consequences for Earth's climate. Increasing loss of glacial ice will lead to increasing water levels in the oceans. Ultimately, these changes could profoundly affect the biosphere.
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    Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, recently spoke with Dr. Marty Mlynczak of NASA's Langley Research Center about the limitations of the technology we have on hand to measure climate change. Things we can't measure could be important in understanding the links between climate
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    Recently, Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, spoke with Dr. Anastasia Romanou, Associate Research Scientist at NASA GISS, about the need for precise local measurements of climate phenomena. Local measurements can provide information about the real impacts of climate change.
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    Scientists widely accept that the Earth's atmosphere underwent a dramatic rise in oxygen 2.4 billion years ago, which ultimately paved the way for complex life on our planet. New research has helped solve some important questions surrounding this 'Great Oxidation Event'.
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    The oceans of Earth play an essential role in making our planet habitable for life as we know it. The future of our oceans, however, may be in jeopardy. Recently, Astrobiology Magazine's climate blog, The Hot Zone, discussed how anoxic waters may affect
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    The Hot Zone recently discussed ocean acidification and what it could mean for the future climate of Earth. Earlier this month expert panels organized by the United Nations discussed ocean acidification and the future of Earth's marine ecosystems.
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    The Hot Zone recently featured a conversation with Dr. Philip Rasch of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Rasch and his team create mathematical models of what the Earth´s climate might look like in the future.
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  • Stratosphere Cycles with the Sun
    Scientists have found that the 11-year solar cycle, the stratosphere and the tropical Pacific Ocean work in sync to generate periodic weather patterns that affect the globe. The findings could be used to predict future climate patterns on Earth.
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  • The Case of the Missing Ice
    By modeling ice sheets in Antarctica, scientists have changed the way we think about Earth's transition 34 million years ago from warm 'greenhouse' to the current, cool 'icehouse'. The new study has important implications for how we understand climate change and its affects on the
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    Scientists have shed new light on the processes behind the Ice Ages experienced by Earth over the past 2.5 million years. Research indicates that they are ultimately linked to shifts in solar radiation caused by changes in the Earth's rotation and axis.
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  • Ancient Booms and Busts
    Research suggests that a period of global warming strongly influenced plants and animals some 53 million to 47 million years ago during the Eocene epoch. The study could help scientists understand the effects that climate change will have in Earth's future.
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    'Geoengineering' refers to human-made changes to the Earth's land, seas or atmosphere that are intended to help slow climate change. However, some scientists are worried that geoengineering techniques may cause more harm than good.
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