Mars

  • Digging Deep
    In this interview, Chris McKay explains why future missions must dig deep into the ice of Mars to learn about the Red Planet's potential for life.
    more...
  • Hydrogen Peroxide Snow
    The planet-wide dust storms that periodically cloak Mars in a mantle of red may be generating a snow of corrosive chemicals, including hydrogen peroxide, that would be toxic to life, according to two new studies published in the most recent issue of the journal Astrobiology.
    more...
  • A View Back at Viking
    Thirty years after the first successful landing on Mars by NASA's Viking spacecraft, the ambitious mission continues to evoke pride and enthusiasm for future space exploration.
    more...
  • Sunning Frozen Soil
    The answer to the question about life on Mars may very well come from analyzing an unsuspecting source - the soil, specifically the icy layer of soil underneath the red planet's surface.
    more...
  • An Automated DAME
    NASA scientists plan to drill someday into the surface of Mars to look for water and signs of possible life. So, scientists are developing an automated, unmanned drill rig that can operate totally on its own, unsupervised for hours at a time.
    more...
  • Spirit Spies Meteorites?
    From its winter outpost at "Low Ridge" inside Gusev Crater, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this spectacular, color mosaic of hilly, sandy terrain and two potential iron meteorites. The two light-colored, smooth rocks about two-thirds of the way up from the bottom of the
    more...
  • Shine of Life
    New research reveals that the dark coating known as desert varnish creates a record of life around it, by binding traces of DNA, amino acids and other organic compounds to desert rocks. Samples of Martian desert varnish could therefore show whether there has been life
    more...
  • On Mars, No One Can Hear You Scream
    It may be difficult for two people to have a conversation on Mars, according to a research paper by Penn State graduate student in acoustics Amanda Hanford and Lyle Long, professor of aerospace engineering.
    more...
  • MRO Putting on the Squeeze
    NASA's newest spacecraft at Mars has already cut the size and duration of each orbit by more than half, just 11 weeks into a 23-week process of shrinking its orbit. By other indicators, the lion's share of the job lies ahead.
    more...
  • PITting Phoenix
    The Phoenix Lander will explore a polar site on Mars to uncover clues about planet's history of water and potential for life. The computer "brain" of spacecraft is now ready for action, and a team has begun adding engineering models of science payload instruments
    more...
  • Follow the Nitrogen
    The great search for extraterrestrial life has focused on water at the expense of a crucial element, say geobiologists at the University of Southern California.
    more...
  • Just in Time
    Just in time to survive the Martian winter, NASA's once-again-lucky Spirit rover has driven to and parked on a north-facing slope in the Columbia Hills.
    more...
  • Piecing Phoenix Together
    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, the next mission to the surface of Mars, is beginning a new phase in preparation for a launch in August 2007.
    more...
  • One for the Water Side?
    These images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, show the Nanedi Valles valley system, a steep-sided feature that may have been formed in part by free-flowing water.
    more...
  • Martian Clay
    Although NASA´s Mars missions grab most of the headlines in the US media, the European Space Agency (ESA) recently announced that its Mars Express orbiter has uncovered an important clue to the history of water – and possibly life – on Mars.

    more...