Mars

  • Rovers Happily Not to Go Away Soon
    NASA has approved up to 18 more months of operations for Spirit and Opportunity, the twin Mars rovers that have already surprised engineers and scientists by continuing active exploration for more than 14 months.
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  • The Martian Mortal Coil
    While the Spirit and Opportunity rovers continue to investigate Mars, scientists are already testing more advanced rovers for future missions. Nathalie Cabrol, a planetary geologist with NASA Ames and the SETI Institute, and a member of the Mars Exploration Rover team, has been testing
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  • Medusa on Mars
    Images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, show part of the Medusa Fossae formation and adjacent areas at the highland-lowland boundary on Mars.
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  • Martian Fire and Ice
    Mars isn't as sleepy as scientists suspected. An international research team, which includes Brown University planetary geologist James Head, has found evidence of recent glacial movement and volcanic eruptions in 3-D images from the Mars Express mission.
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  • Warming Up to a Martian Carcass
    The detection of methane on Mars has generated a lot of speculation about what could possibly be producing it. Is it coming out of active volcanoes? Maybe the methane results from some geologic or chemical process we don't yet understand.
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  • The Martian Frozen Sea
    At the recent European Space Agency's Mars Express conference, scientists announced they had found a frozen sea on the martian equator. John Murray, from the Department of Earth Sciences at the Open University in the UK, is lead author on the paper to be
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  • Dust Devil, The Movie
    One of the most elusive but fascinating movies one could make on Mars today is a time-lapse film of an afternoon dust devil, or miniature tornado. Spirit rover scientists have finally captured a brief animation of such a tiny twister.
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  • Mars: The Other Time-of-Flight
    Recent discoveries on Mars such as methane in the atmosphere, a subterranean ice pack near the equator, and evidence of flowing water in the planet's past brings new speculation to the most frequently asked questions about the Red Planet: Is there, or was there ever
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  • Search for a Second Genesis
    Chris McKay, a planetary scientist at the Ames Research Center, has long been investigating the coldest and driest places on Earth. In this part of McKay's lecture series, entitled, Drilling in Permafrost on Mars to Search for a Second Genesis of Life, he touches on
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  • Follow the Salt
    This generation of Mars explorers has met the challenge to investigate the water history on the red planet. Their task has been compared to one directed towards 'following the water'. Recent driving expeditions have highlighted this water history by looking for residual salt flats.
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  • Happy Hunting Grounds
    While most planetary scientists believe water on Mars is the best clue to finding interesting rock samples, there are big questions that remain about where exactly that water may be found. New results give a short-list for some who track the water history on the
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  • Sounding Out Mars
    After a year's delay, the MARSIS instrument on the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter will soon be deployed. In this interview, Jeffrey Plaut of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory describes how the radar instrument could uncover how much, if any, liquid water lies hidden
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  • Forming the Canyon on Mars
    How does an arid and bone-dry landscape form the largest canyon in the solar system? The question on Mars maps to the Valles Marineris, a crack in the planet so large as to dwarf the Grand Canyon and a primary imaging target for the Mars
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  • Frozen Sea Once Near Martian Equator?
    Recent observations from the orbiting Mars Express probe may show the characteristic rippling expected from past sea-ice. When coupled with findings that methane may be generated today on Mars, this sea-ice finding enriches the debate over modern prospects for life-supporting conditions on the red planet.
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  • What’s Up, Below Martian Soil
    The use of orbiting radar to probe the first three miles underneath the martian surface has been greenlighted. Following review board panels to assess the feasibility, the Mars Express probe will commence its underground searching in May.
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