Mars

  • Mars Life: Trouble Without the Rubble?
    The Mars Opportunity site has continued to intrigue mission scientists and astrobiologists who study the prospects for life elsewhere in the universe. Finding evidence of water is a ways from finding evidence of life, but the absence of rocky rubble has contributed uniquely to what
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  • Proof of Water
    The evidence supporting a watery past on Mars is summarized by the rover team in their recent synopsis of early Opportunity results in Science magazine. According to Mark Lemmon of Texas A&M University, proof of water begins in the clouds but mostly remains locked in
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  • The Martian Methane Surprise
    Is the methane on Mars coming from deep underground? Astrobiologist Mike Mumma discusses some possibilities while explaining how to measure methane on another world.
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  • Blueberries, Add Water and Stir
    The remarkable story at Meridiani Planum is just beginning to be told, but the compilation of the water history at the Opportunity site has scientists prepared to view the red planet's aqueous past.
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  • Spirit’s Mars Reads Like a Mystery Novel
    Principal investigator for the science package on the Mars Exploration Rovers, Steve Squyres, talks with Astrobiology Magazine about the future of the Spirit rover and what has been learned so far from its exploration of Gusev Crater.
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  • Martian Day Dreaming
    Few images are more startling than seeing active weather from the surface of another planet. The evidence of clouds, sunset, and twisters raises the prospect of what a future Earth-like world might present to its first observer. The Mars case is an instance of seeing
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  • Mars: Collapsed Canyon
    The Mars Express orbiter continues to offer high-resolution clues to the strange geological formations in the largest canyon in our solar system, Valles Marineris. The middle and eastern sections feature a collection of collapsed structures along the steep canyon walls.
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  • Not Finding Life? Dig Deeper
    Travelling to the most arid spot, the Atacama desert in Chile, has led scientists to label it a fair Mars analog. But figuring out how microbes survive decadal dry spells has researchers still guessing about life on Earth, before they speculate about Mars.
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  • Martian Retrospective
    As the rovers try to survive the dead of martian winter, what do readers want to know about their first nine-months on the red planet? Questions and answers range from how long the rovers may last to what it's like to live four months on
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  • Big Planet, Tiny Vehicles
    What can the Mars rovers do after reaching Endurance Crater? Principal investigator Steve Squyres talked with Astrobiology Magazine about what's next: Can Opportunity drive five more kilometers to Victoria Crater, while being commanded by dedicated graduate students? He introduces two tiny vehicles to a big
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  • Living Large in a Lava Tube
    While the current generation of Mars missions seek out the planet's water history, another line of evidence is also required for life: heat. Active surface volcanoes may not currently exist on Mars, but the red planet has a colorful volcanic past and some enormous lava
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  • Water from a Stone
    One question that has puzzled planetary scientists is where is the water on Mars today? One answer that is being investigated is mineral storage, particularly hydration of magnesium sulfate salts. If these storehouses protect water from evaporation, a second set of questions arise as to
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  • Phobos Up Close
    The Mars Express high-resolution camera has captured stunning images of the red planet's largest moon, Phobos. Because the moon orbits so close, Mars dominates the sky to a viewer on the surface of Phobos.
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  • Opportunity: On the Edge
    The Mars Opportunity rover is trying to back its way out of the steep Endurance Crater. Mission planners have judged their first route as too risky, and now look to climb the way they descended months ago.
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  • Mars Lava and Faults
    One of the most fascinating and thoroughly studied regions on Mars is Valles Marineris, the largest canyon in the solar system. As imaged by Mars Express, orbital views of the canyon's western end show the geological remnants of wind, water, volcanoes and perhaps faults.
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