Mars

  • On Mars, No One Can Hear You Scream
    It may be difficult for two people to have a conversation on Mars, according to a research paper by Penn State graduate student in acoustics Amanda Hanford and Lyle Long, professor of aerospace engineering.
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  • MRO Putting on the Squeeze
    NASA's newest spacecraft at Mars has already cut the size and duration of each orbit by more than half, just 11 weeks into a 23-week process of shrinking its orbit. By other indicators, the lion's share of the job lies ahead.
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  • PITting Phoenix
    The Phoenix Lander will explore a polar site on Mars to uncover clues about planet's history of water and potential for life. The computer "brain" of spacecraft is now ready for action, and a team has begun adding engineering models of science payload instruments
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  • Follow the Nitrogen
    The great search for extraterrestrial life has focused on water at the expense of a crucial element, say geobiologists at the University of Southern California.
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  • Just in Time
    Just in time to survive the Martian winter, NASA's once-again-lucky Spirit rover has driven to and parked on a north-facing slope in the Columbia Hills.
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  • Piecing Phoenix Together
    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, the next mission to the surface of Mars, is beginning a new phase in preparation for a launch in August 2007.
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  • One for the Water Side?
    These images, taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board ESA's Mars Express spacecraft, show the Nanedi Valles valley system, a steep-sided feature that may have been formed in part by free-flowing water.
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  • Martian Clay
    Although NASA´s Mars missions grab most of the headlines in the US media, the European Space Agency (ESA) recently announced that its Mars Express orbiter has uncovered an important clue to the history of water – and possibly life – on Mars.

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  • Wintering on Mars
    NASA's Mars rover Spirit has reached a safe site for the Martian winter, while its twin, Opportunity, is making fast progress toward a destination of its own. The two rovers recently set out on important -- but very different -- drives after earlier weeks inspecting
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  • MRO Test Snaps
    The first test images of Mars from NASA's newest spacecraft provide a tantalizing preview of what the orbiter will reveal when its main science mission begins next fall.
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  • Mars Cold Case
    Evidence never dies in the popular TV show Cold Case. Nor do some traces of life disappear on Earth, Mars, or elsewhere. An international team of scientists has developed techniques to detect miniscule amounts of biological remains, dubbed biosignatures, in the frozen Mars-like terrain of
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  • Hobbled Spirit Heading for Sun
    NASA's long-lived Mars rovers demand lots of care, as they age and the Martian winter approaches.
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  • Tricorder Going to Mars
    It'll be a snap to identify gemstones once Robert Downs finishes his library of spectral fingerprints for all the Earth's minerals.
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  • MRO Hits Its Mark
    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter peeked from behind the Red Planet and told mission scientists it survived the journey. Breathing a huge sigh of relief, the scientists now plan to reduce its current elongated orbit around Mars into a more circular one.
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  • MRO Approaches Mars
    On Friday, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) will reach Mars. Will it start orbiting the planet, fly right past it, or dive too close to the atmosphere and burn up? Because the spacecraft must loop behind the planet, mission scientists won´t know the
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