Mars

  • Roses for the Red Planet
    At a conference on terraforming Mars, one topic of discussion was the importance - and the risks - of seeding the Red Planet.
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  • Build Your Own Planet
    Build your own virtual planet, complete with weather, habitable tropics and a tunable thermostat. In reality, changing an entire biosphere would dwarf the limits of engineers' most grand projects: Hoover Dam, Suez and Panama Canals, or hurricane cloud-seeding.
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  • Mars: Cold, Dry, Red and Dead?
    The theory of a warm, wet past for Mars comes under scrutiny based on impact craters analyzed by a Colorado and NASA Ames research team. Their new Science article looks at the implications for ancient life on the Red Planet - if indeed, the weather
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  • Name The Extreme Explorers
    Don't miss the January deadline to name the Mars Exploration Rovers, scheduled to launch towards the red planet in June and roam the distance of a football field each day.
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  • Where on Earth is Mars?
    Among the thousands of visitors to Mt. Etna this year, one group came not just to look at one of most famous volcanoes on Earth. Dozens of scientists trekked up Etna together this fall to observe what Etna has in common with Mars.
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  • Smoking Craters: Home to Martian Life?
    Mars may be smaller than Earth, but it's still huge to a roving spacecraft that can cover only 100 meters a day. For that reason, Mars mission planners must go to great lengths to find landing sites that might still carry evidence that life once
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  • Five Year Retrospective: Mars Pathfinder
    Five years ago today, on September 27, 1997, the Mars Pathfinder lander began to tally up its remarkable mission history. The excitement was non-stop beginning only 3 minutes after landing, when the first signals of success came back to rapt Earth-bound listeners.
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  • No Drought of Mars Landing Sites
    With the Mars Exploration Rover (or MER) landing sites narrowed from 150 alternatives, the prospect of roaming around ancient lakebeds or searching for the grey crystals called hematite has orbital cameras clicking.
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  • Martian X-Rays
    The image of a planet in X-rays is surprising since such stellar glows usually are associated with stars, black holes and other large-scale astronomical objects. The simplest ways to generate X-rays requires temperatures in excess of a million degrees.
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  • Andromeda Chamber: Looking for Low Pressure Life
    University of Arkansas' researchers used a low-pressure chamber, Martian soil simulants, and an atmosphere of only hydrogen and carbon dioxide, to grow bacteria. As a Mars' simulation, the pressure is still too high by several factors, but their recipe is one step closer to an
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  • Scientists Rehearse for NASA’s Next (2004) Mars Landing
    With less than a year to go before the launch of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission, scientists have spent the last few weeks at a high-tech summer camp. The 10-day blind test, which ran from Aug. 10 to 19, used the Field Integrated Design Operations
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  • Biosignature in Martian Meteorite, Allan Hills
    Kathie Thomas-Keprta, an astrobiologist at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston and researcher on an Applied and Environmental Microbiology study, reports: "one-quarter of the magnetite crystals embedded in the carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 require biology to explain
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  • August of Wind: Storm Chasing on the Red Planet
    On August 8th, a rare Mars Orbital Camera image was released capturing a dust devil in the act of creating a streak as it climbed an embankment out of a crater.
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  • Martian Meteor’s Magnetic Makeup
    A 4.5 billion year old Martian meteorite, and the new evidence that one quarter of the meteorite's magnetic material derived from ancient bacteria.
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  • Internet Engagement with Space
    People come to astrobiology because it addresses deep and profound questions about who are we, where are we from, and where are we going. Understand a current perspective, from a remarkable interview with Ann Druyan and astrophysicist Steven Soter.
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