Solar System

  • Amalthea Flyby: The Heat is On
    On November 5, the Galileo spacecraft with fly less than 100 miles over one of Jupiter's moons called Almathea. The moon is unique as one that gives off more heat than it receives from the Sun--perhaps from Jupiter's radiation bands or tidal heating.
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  • News_Image_85
    From the Hubble Telescope to the even cooler Webb, a new generation of hot views promise insight into some of the most distant galactic incubators. The chances to image a distant planet may benefit from the enhanced infrared tools available to the next generation of
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  • No Drought of Mars Landing Sites
    With the Mars Exploration Rover (or MER) landing sites narrowed from 150 alternatives, the prospect of roaming around ancient lakebeds or searching for the grey crystals called hematite has orbital cameras clicking.
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  • Tuning In to Other Worlds
    Some scientists think it may be possible to detect planets beyond our solar system by looking for radio signals generated by same forces that lead to 'Northern Lights'. A team of scientists working on a radio telescope called the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR)
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  • Martian X-Rays
    The image of a planet in X-rays is surprising since such stellar glows usually are associated with stars, black holes and other large-scale astronomical objects. The simplest ways to generate X-rays requires temperatures in excess of a million degrees.
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  • Andromeda Chamber: Looking for Low Pressure Life
    University of Arkansas' researchers used a low-pressure chamber, Martian soil simulants, and an atmosphere of only hydrogen and carbon dioxide, to grow bacteria. As a Mars' simulation, the pressure is still too high by several factors, but their recipe is one step closer to an
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  • Gravity’s Telescope
    Using a technique known as "gravitational microlensing", astronomers hope to find planets in Earth-like orbits around stars halfway across the galaxy.
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  • Scientists Rehearse for NASA’s Next (2004) Mars Landing
    With less than a year to go before the launch of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover mission, scientists have spent the last few weeks at a high-tech summer camp. The 10-day blind test, which ran from Aug. 10 to 19, used the Field Integrated Design Operations
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  • Voyage of The Voyagers: First Quarter-Century
    When initially launched on August 20, 1977, the Voyager missions to Jupiter and Saturn were considered mission-capable for around 5-year lives. But after 25 years, there is a good chance that another 25 years for their tour is on-course.
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  • Biosignature in Martian Meteorite, Allan Hills
    Kathie Thomas-Keprta, an astrobiologist at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston and researcher on an Applied and Environmental Microbiology study, reports: "one-quarter of the magnetite crystals embedded in the carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 require biology to explain
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  • Commitment to Life on This Earth
    Among other projects, find out about archaeological research for the site of Helike, which is an ancient Greek city destroyed by an earthquake and tsunami in 373 BC.
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  • August of Wind: Storm Chasing on the Red Planet
    On August 8th, a rare Mars Orbital Camera image was released capturing a dust devil in the act of creating a streak as it climbed an embankment out of a crater.
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  • Jupiter Uncloaks: Most Moons Ever Found at Once
    When Galileo's first telescope found 4 Jovian moons, could he have imagined? The most moons ever found at once--11. Discovered by Hawaii astronomers using a 7-foot lens at Mauna Kea, the moons must have been captured from solar-orbitting asteroids.
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  • Martian Meteor’s Magnetic Makeup
    A 4.5 billion year old Martian meteorite, and the new evidence that one quarter of the meteorite's magnetic material derived from ancient bacteria.
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  • Fermi´s Paradox: Where Are They?
    If there is intelligent life out there, why haven't we found it yet?
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