• Learn about one of the most ‘mind blowing’ events known in the Universe – a supernova. Free and quick learning from The Open University in the United Kingdom.

  • Just how big was the Big Bang? Discover how scientists have calculated the exact volume of the noise created at the birth of the Universe. Free and quick learning from The Open University in the United Kingdom

  • This NASA parody has successfully landed on the Internet, no parachute needed. This light-hearted parody, “We’re NASA and We Know It,” reworks LMFAO’s infectious hit “Sexy and I Know It” with new lyrics adjusted for full-throttle space geekiness.

  • Georgia Tech Assistant Professor Josef Dufek created bomb sags in his lab by propelling particles into sand beds. The demonstration is used to study a sag on the Martian surface, created when a volcano erupted nearly 3.5 billion years ago. The study provides more evidence of water on early Mars.

  • Imagine reaching the moon using just a tenth of a liter of fuel. With their ionic motor, MicroThrust, EPFL scientists and their European partners are making this a reality, ushering in a new era of low-cost space exploration. Video Courtesy of EPFL News

  • Meenakshi Wadhwa, director of the Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, talks about why she has spent her career investigating meteorites.

  • Preparing for future human exploration, NASA’s next rover mission to Mars includes the SwRI-built Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), one of 10 instruments that will assess past and present habitability of the Red Planet. Credit: Southwest Research Institute:

  • Did climate change or humans cause the extinctions of the large-bodied Ice Age mammals (commonly called megafauna) such as the woolly rhinoceros and woolly mammoth? Credit: Texas A&M

  • Scientists have discovered a fish that uses tools. The orange-dotted tuskfish was caught on film using a clam to crush a rock.

  • NPR requested from NASA this 1980s-era video with commentary by astronauts of various missions. The footage, which we edited, arrived on VHS. We don’t know much about it, except that it’s playful in tone, so we decided to have some fun with it, too. Here’s an “instructional video” on survival in space, in case we ever decide to resurrect the program. Credit: Emily Bogle & Mito Habe-Evans/NPR