• Science by the Light of the Moon
    Researchers, students and professionals from around the world gathered in July at the NASA Lunar Science Conference to discuss the future of robotic and human exploration of the moon.
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  • A Warm Breath of Carbon Dioxide
    When the sun was young, it didn't produce enough heat to unfreeze ice on our planet. So why was the early Earth covered in liquid water and not ice?
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  • Ancient Footprints in the Salt
    Scientists have discovered fibers from ancient organisms preserved inside salt crystals in New Mexico. The surprising finding could help astrobiologists search for signs of life on other planets.
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  • Stars of the Deep
    Researchers studying life deep beneath the Earth's surface in a South African platinum mine have discovered microbes with a unique appearance. In fact, these tiny bacteria are the 'stars' of their community.
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  • Testing for Life on Mars
    Controversy still surrounds the life-detection results from NASA's Viking mission of 30 years ago. The Phoenix mission now on Mars may help answer questions raised by Viking, but researchers will need to be able to spot the difference between chemical and biological signatures.
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  • Targeting a Lunar Bulls-Eye
    Using Earth-based radar, scientists have studied ejecta material from the moon's Orientale impact basin. The new data has implications for future robotic and human missions to explore the lunar south pole.
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  • Oceans Gasping for Breath
    During the Jurassic, global warming and severe environmental change led to the extinction of many species. One of the most intriguing effects was that the oceans became starved of oxygen.
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  • A Hitchhiker’s Guide to Astrobiology
    You're an astrobiologist standing in the centre of a vast, empty expanse of rock and dust pockmarked with impact craters. In order to accomplish your task, you've packed an entire suitcase. The question is what did you bring?
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  • A Hitchhiker's Guide to Astrobiology
    You're an astrobiologist standing in the centre of a vast, empty expanse of rock and dust pockmarked with impact craters. In order to accomplish your task, you've packed an entire suitcase. The question is what did you bring?
    more...