• In 2010, a team of scientists discovered a new species of sea anemones beneath Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf. The new anemones are the first known to live in ice.
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  • For the first time, scientists have detected water molecules on the surface of interplanetary dust particles. The findings open a new possibility about the delivery of life's ingredients to Earth and potentially elsewhere.
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  • Researchers have published a simpler, safer method for conducting Miller-Urey origin of life experiments--which may still yield new insight about how life began on Earth.
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  • A new model suggests that large exoplanets may have both oceans and exposed continents -- conditions that could lead to an Earth-like stable climate.
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  • As 2013 draws to a close, Astrobiology Magazine highlights the year's top stories. At number 5 is the discovery of microbial life signs in rocks 3.48 billion years old--possibly the oldest signs of life on Earth. (Originally published on 11/14/13)
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  • A new paper reveals how the worst extinction in Earth's history may have been tied to the formation of Supercontinent Pangea. The catastrophe wasn't triggered by an impact from above--unlike another well-known extinction--but by a geological process below, deep within Earth's core.
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  • Scientists have found signs of microbial life in rocks 3.48 billion years old--possibly the oldest signs of life on Earth. These sedimentary structures may guide our search for life on Mars.
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  • A new study explores effects of moonlight on nocturnal mammals, and the results could change the way scientsts think about moonlight and predation.
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  • A new paper suggests a large impact in the ocean 570 million years ago caused a re-organization of Earth’s environment, setting the stage for the emergence of complex life.
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  • Researchers have found that, under the right conditions, the yeast S. pombe doesn’t grow old. The discovery provides insight into our understanding of aging, and shows that even some of the best-studied life forms can still have surprising qualities.
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