Climate

  • Killer Lakes: Part I
    Defusing Africa's killer lakes in a remote region of Cameroon, an international team of scientists takes extraordinary steps to prevent the recurrence of a deadly natural disaster. This three part excerpt gives a first-hand account of global climate change by award-winning science journalist, Kevin Krajick.
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  • Rotten Sulfur Brew, The Great Dying?
    The greatest catastrophe for life on Earth occurred 250 million years ago, when nine of ten species disappeared. But the cause of this great dying remains a mystery.
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  • The Suffocating Age
    University of Washington researchers report on what may have caused two major extinction events, one of which wiped out nine of ten species on Earth. A rise in temperature coupled to a fall in oxygen may have favored a whole new breathing apparatus.
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  • The Rise of Oxygen
    When one looks back on our planet from space, an intriguing finding centers on its apparent biochemical contradictions: Earth has lots of chlorophyl and thus plants, but also has lots of oxygen, which is a poisonous element or vegetative waste product.
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  • Ring World
    An opaque Earth ring could have acted as the trigger to at least one episode of global glaciation.
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  • Commitment to Life on This Earth
    Among other projects, find out about archaeological research for the site of Helike, which is an ancient Greek city destroyed by an earthquake and tsunami in 373 BC.
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  • Carbon Conundrum
    As scientists study the complicated dynamics of a warming planet, they are trying to understand the movement of Earth's principal greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, as it meanders through the planet's atmosphere, biosphere, and geosphere.
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  • Tropical Glaciers
    Glacial deposits that formed on tropical land areas during snowball Earth episodes around 600 million years ago, lead to questions about how the glaciers that left the deposits were created. Now, Penn State geoscientists believe that these glaciers could only have formed after the Earth's
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  • Did Hades Freeze Over?
    Initially, the surface of our planet was a fiery, molten stew. Within a few million years, the crust cooled and water vapor rained down to form the oceans, where life may have made it's first appearance.
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