Extreme Life

  • Scientists have discovered otherworldly microbial mounds deep in an Antarctic lake. The microbial stromatolites are unlike any others yet identified, and could help astrobiologists understand primitive life on the early Earth.
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  • All life as we know it needs water. But what organisms can survive when water is all but unavailable? To find out, one scientist is looking at soil from two of the driest places on Earth.
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  • Scientists have used mussels as inspiration in developing a protective coating that could enable living cells to survive as dormant cells in extreme conditions.
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  • Exotic life forms may be lurking in your home, and a new citizen science project seeks to find them. By sampling home water heaters to study the micro-organisms that thrive there, scientists can learn more about the types of life we may find beyond
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  • Mutant Microbes Test Radiation Resistance
    The bacterium B. subtilis is capable of adapting to UV levels even higher than what existed on the primordial Earth – a harbinger of untapped potential that still lies within some organisms. Mutant versions of this microbe are now being exposed to space radiation
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  • Researchers recently searched the dunes of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) for microbial life. The team included scientists and students who explored remote, extreme environments in the deserts of the UAE as analogs for Mars and Saturn's moon, Titan.
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  • A new microscopic 'cloak' could change the way that scientists capture images of bacteria and other cells. The new technology could help uncover new discoveries about life at the cellular level.
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  • Sea-ice algae plays an important role supporting the food web in places like the Arctic Ocean. New research shows that this algae can engineer ice to its advantage by secreting a gel-like mucus that acts as a kind of anti-freeze. The study shows a unique
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  • New evidence shows that saline groundwaters in South Africa may be the oldest known water on Earth. Fractures in rocks in the Witwatersrand Basin that are filled with this water also support the deepest known microbial ecosystem on Earth.
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  • New evidence shows that saline groundwaters in South Africa may be the oldest known water on Earth. Fractures in rocks in the Witwatersrand Basin that are filled with this water also support the deepest known microbial ecosystem on Earth.
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